War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0219 Chapter LVI. THE SAVANNAH CAMPAIGN.

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the corps, I directed Colonel Carman to move the remaining regiments of his brigade to Argyle Island and from thence to the South Carolina shore. Owing to the want of boats the passage to the South Carolina shore was made with great difficulty, and it was not until the 19th instant that the whole brigade had effected a landing on the Carolina shore, where it took up a position threatening the Charleston and Savannah road. Understanding that the object of this movement was merely to threaten the enemy's only line of communications, and thereby cause him to withdraw his troops from his main line in front of Savannah, I directed Colonel Carman to present a bold front and sent out frequent reconnaissances. On the morning of the 21st, the enemy having evacuated the city of Savannah during the afternoon and night previous, I received ordered from the brigadier-General commanding the corps to move the First and Second Brigades to a position nearer the city. The First Brigade was moved at once to the position assigned to it, but owing to the high winds which prevailed during this and the following day, and the activity of the enemy, quite a force of which still remained in his front, Colonel Carman was unable to cross his entire brigade to the Georgia shore until the afternoon of the 22d. During the crossing, Colonel John H. Ketcham, commanding One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers, a brave and efficient officer, was wounded severely in the thigh. In the evening of the 22nd the Second Brigade was brought to its present camp, and on the following morning the Third Brigade, which had remained in its old position until the trains could be moved to the vicinity of the city, was also brought up and encamped, with right resting of Savannah River.

During the march, which from time of leaving Atlanta to the arrival before Savannah occupied twenty-six days, the troops of my command subsisted mostly upon provisions taken from the country through which we passed, and were abundantly supplied. After arriving in front of Savannah a large supply of rice was found on the plantations in the vicinity, upon which, with the beef-cattle on hand, the command subsisted until supplies were obtained from the fleet.

The following supplies were taken from the country by the foraging parties which were sent out daily:

Beef-cattle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560

Sheep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300

Hogs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500

Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . Pounds. . . . . . . 298,472

Fodder. . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . . . . . 399,051

Rice(in sheaf). . . . . Do. . . . . . . . . 20,000

Rice(threshed). . . . . Do. . . . . . . . . 38,000

Sweet potatoes. . . . . Do. . . . . . . . . 164,200

Meal and flour. . . . . . Pounds. . . 1,500

Bacon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 1,000

Fresh meat. . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 95,000

Sugar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 1,000

Tobacco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 1,500

Molasses. . . . . . . . . Barrels. . . . . 26

Whisky. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 3

Salt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 6

In addition to the foregoing, on the 10th of December a foraging party of Carman's brigade, commanded by Captain Gildersleeve, One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers, captured the dispatch steamer Ida from the enemy, taking thirteen prisoners, among whom was Colonel Clinch, of General Hardee's staff. On account of the approach of rebel gun-boats, Captain Gildersleeve burned the steamer after removing the prisoners. On the 12th Colonel Hawley, commanding Third Wisconsin, on Argyle Island, took possession of the steamer Resolute, which had been driven on the Argyle shore by Captain Winegar's battery. The boat and stores captured upon her, as well prisoners, were turned over by Colonel Hawley directly to corps headquarters.

One hundred and fifty horses and 175 mules were captured during the march. Of these 130 horses were turned over to the provost-