War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0211 Chapter LVI. THE SAVANNAH CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

Forage-

Pounds.

By captain Whittlesey's report:

Fodder taken en route. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,091,619

Fodder taken near Atlanta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138,200

Total fodder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,229,819

Rice fodder:

By Captain Whittlesey's report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550,694

By Major Reynolds' report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,000

Total rice fodder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570,694

There was with the corps an average of over 7,000 animals. At the regulation allowance these animals have consumed, in twenty-days, 2,100,000 pounds corn; hay or fodder, 2,450,000 pounds.

I estimate that at least this quality was taken from the country on the march and exclusive of that taken before marching from Atlanta. Upon this basis estimates made on actual returns to Captain Whittlesey and Major Reynolds will be increased over 700,000 pounds of corn and 800,000 pounds of fodder. The waste of this, as of other articles, was enormous.

Subsistence taken the country, as per report of Lieutenant-Colonel Bulloch, chief commissary of subsistence.

Fresh beef. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pounds. . . . 400,000

Fresh pork and mutton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . do. . . . . . 150,000

Rice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . do. . . . . . 110,000

Flour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . do. . . . . . 20,000

Sweet potatoes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . bushels. . . . 6,500

Sorghum sirup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . gallons. . . . 4,000

Of the quantities of turkeys, geese, ducks, end poultry of all kinds taken, no approximate estimate can be made. For at least 200 miles of our route these articles were in great abundance, and were used lavishly and wastefully. So of the other articles above mentioned, it would be safe to say that the amount might be doubled for waste and subsistence of thousands of refugee slaves who followed our march.

Cotton. -I estimate the quantity of cotton burned by the corps at 5,000 bales, or 2,500,000 pounds. The estimate is probably low, as our line of march was through some of the best cotton-growing portions of Georgia, and we swept, with our forages and flankers, a belt of six to eight miles in width of all the cotton and most of the gins and presses. No large accumulations were found except at Milledgeville, reported 1,800 bales, bonded by order of General Sherman; near Sandersville, where about 100 bales destroyed; at Lee Jordan's plantation, 280 bales destroyed by General Geary, and at Tennille Station, on Central railroad, where between 300 and 400 bales were burned; other lots ranging from ten to thirty bales were frequently found.

Fugitive slaves. - Negroes of all ages and of every variety of physical condition, from the infant in its mother's arms to the decrepid old man, joined the column from plantations and from cross-roads, singly and in large groups, on foot, on horseback, and in every description of vehicles. The vehicles were discarded, as obstructing the progress of our very long column. Beyond this no effort was made to drive away the fugitives. The decrepid, the aged, and the feeble were told of the long journey before them, and advised to remain behind. I estimate that at from 6,000 to 8,000 slaves, at different points in the campaign, joined the march of this corps, of whom something over 2,500 reached our camp before Savannah. About 1,700, of whom one-third