War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0193 Chapter LVI. THE Savannah CAMPAIGN.

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and I am satisfied without the order, knowledge, or consent of the regimental commanders. I at no time received any order from the corps commander (to whom alone was, by Special Field Orders, Numbers 120, Military Division of the Mississippi, intrusted the power to destroy such) for the destruction of any cotton gin or gins or cotton. I have, therefore, none to report. It would be impossible for me to even approximate to a correct statement of the forage and supplies obtained by the brigade. In order to give some idea of the amount, I have already stated the number of days for which we were fully and regularly rations, both on the North Alabama campaign and the campaign to Savannah; now I will give the aggregate number of officers and men, of the brigade in each campaign, then add that of provisions and forage gathered from the country. The men and animals had at all times abundance. The aggregate number of officers and men of the brigade in the North Alabama campaign was 1,600; horses and mules, 48, for which forage was exclusively drawn from the country. In the latter campaign to Savannah the aggregate of officers and men of the brigade was 1,843; horses and mules, 380, for all of which abundance of forage and provisions was at all times obtained from the country through which we passed.

Accompanying this report you will find a full list of the casualties in the brigade from the 29th of September to the fall of Savannah. * The total number of miles traveled by rail by the brigade on the North Alabama campaign was 334 mils; total number of miles marched on the same campaign up to November 15, when the brigade arrived at Atlanta, 134 miles; total number of miles marched on the campaign from Atlanta to Savannah was 284 miles, making in all a distance of 752 miles.

I would be doing injustice to those who deserve otherwise were I to close this report without acknowledging that the regimental commanders of this brigade-Lieutenant Colonel M. R. Vernon, Seventy-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; Major Frederick Beck, One hundred and eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Major A. B. Robinson, One hundred and twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Captain Peter Ege, Thirty-fourth Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry; Captain Toland Jones, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Captain J. R. McLaughlin, Ninety-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry-have at all times been most prompt in the execution of all orders intrusted to them, and, in assisting along the trains, removing obstructions, building and repairing bridges, and preserving discipline in their respective commands, displayed a praiseworthy energy and resolution.

The One hundred and eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was not with the brigade on the Florence campaign. It rejoined the command on the 17th of November.

Of the members of the brigade staff-Major T. B. Williams, One hundred and twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, surgeon-in-chief; Captain J. S. Wilson, assistant adjutant-General, U. S. Volunteers; Captain J. Van Brimer, One hundred and twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, assistant commissary of subsistence; Captain Joseph Swisher, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, acting assistant quartermaster; Captain Hiram J. Craft, Ninety-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, acting assistant inspector-General; Captain G. H. Reynolds, Seventy-eighth Illinois, provost-marshal; First Lieutenant W. C. Robinson, Thirty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, acting aide-de-camp; Second

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*Not found.

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13 R R-VOL XLIV