War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0158 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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each corps, with all the trains, moved on an interior road direct to Louisville. The bridges over the Ogeechee and Rocky Comfort Creek had been destroyed by the enemy, but a pontoon bridge was soon constructed by Colonel Buell, and on the 29th both corps were encamped near Louisville.

Two divisions of the Fourteenth Corps left Louisville December 1, crossing Buck Head Creek five miles above the church, and passing through Habersham, reached Jacksonborough on the 5th. Baird's division moved from Louisville in support of the cavalry, and made a demonstration in the direction of Waynesborough, rejoining the corps at Jacksonborough. The Twentieth Corps left Louisville December 1, crossing Buck Head Creek at the church, and passing through Birdville struck the railroad leading from Millen to Augusta, five miles from Millen, and encamped on the 5th near Hunter's Mills. From Jacksonborough the Fourteenth Corps moved toward Savannah on the Augusta and Savannah road, the Twentieth Corps taking the road through Springfield. On the 10th of December my command reached the main line of the enemy's works in front of Savannah road, the Twentieth Corps taking the road through Springfield. On the 10th of December my command reached the main line of the enemy's works in front of Savannah, and took position, the Twentieth Corps on the left, with its left resting on the Savannah River, the Fourteenth on the right and connecting with the Seventeenth Cops beyond the canal near Lawson's plantation. Our line was estriver in such positions as prevented any boats from passing. The steamer Ida, while attempting to pass up from Savannah, on the 10th of December, was captured and burned. On the 12th two gun-boats and the steamer Resolute attempted to pass our batteries from above, but both gun-boats were driven back by Winegar's battery, and the steamer was so disabled that she fell into our hands. She was soon repaired, and has since been transferred to the quartermaster's department. On the 18th a brigade of the First Division, Twentieth Corps, was thrown across the river, and established near Izard's plantation, on the South Carolina shore, in a position which threatened the only line of communication still held by the enemy. A bridge in the meantime had been constructed by the enemy from the city to the South Carolina shore, and on the evening of December 20 he commenced the evacuation of the city. The movement was discovered at 3 a. m. on the 21st, ad my command was at once moved forward and occupied the city.

For a more detailed account of each day's operations, I respectfully refer you to the reports of Major General J. C. Davis, commanding Fourteenth Corps, and Brigadier General A. S. Williams, commanding Twentieth Corps, together with the reports of the subordinate commanders, all of which are herewith inclosed. So far as active opposition on the part of the enemy was concerned, there was hardly an event worthy of mention in a report of this nature. The only real annoyance we experienced was from the destruction of bridges, and the obstruction of roads by fallen timber, and these obstacles were very readily overcome.

The conduct of the officers and men on the march is worthy of the highest praise. They endured the fatigues of the march with cheerfulness, and were ever ready, even at the close of a long days' march, to use the ax and spade in removing obstructions and repairing roads and bridges.

The result of the campaign proves conclusively the particability of subsisting large bodies of troops upon the enemy's country. After leaving the section of country near Atlanta, which had already been