War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0106 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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The loss of brigade in killed was 14; in wounded, 42 -this number includes only those sent to hospital.

The loss of the enemy in killed and wounded could not have been less than 1,500, about 300 of whom were killed.

The total number of men engaged was 1,300.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT F. CATTERSON,

Colonel, commanding Brigade.

Captain WILSON,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, First Div., fifteenth Army Corps.

ADDENDA.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE, Gordon, ga., November 23, 1864.

Major-General OSTERHAUS,

Commanding Fifteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I take sincere pleasure in congratulating the brigade of General Walcutt, of General Wood's division, of the Fifteenth Corps, on its complete success in the action of yesterday. Officers from other commands who were looking on say that there never was a better brigade of soldiers. I am exceedingly sorry that any of our brave men should fall, and for the suffering of those that are wounded. The thanks of the army are doubly due to them. I tender my sympathy through you to the brave and excellent commander of the brigade, Brigadier-General Walcutt. It is hoped that his wound may not disable him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

P. S. - The loss of the enemy is estimated from 1,500 to 2,000 killed, wounded, and prisoners.

O. O. H.,

Major-General.

No. 18. Report of Major Asias Willison, One hundred and third Illinois Infantry. HEADQUARTERS 103rd Illinois VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Greene Square, Savannah, Ga., January 2, 1865.

In compliance with instructions received from brigade headquarters, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the campaign just ended:

On the morning of November 13, 1864, the regiment moved from camp at Vining's Station, Ga., with the division. At 7 a. M. crossed the Chattahoochee River and passed through the city of Atlanta, and bivouacked one mile and a half west of the city, where we remained until the morning of the 15th of November, when we broke camp and marched with the brigade and division through Rough and Ready Station. Here our advance had a slight skirmish with the enemy. Nothing occurred along the line of our march until the morning of the 22nd of November, when, with the brigade, my regiment moved out early