War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0102 OPERATIONS IN S. C., GA., AND FLA. Chapter LVI.

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front. One regiment - the Twelfth Indiana, Major Baldwin - moved on to the support of Second Brigade, and went into position on the right of the line, advanced skirmishers, meeting the enemy's skirmishers just in time to prevent them from flanking the Second Brigade. The Twelfth Indiana had one man slightly wounded. Adjt. Marshal H. Parks had his horse shot from under him while assisting in forming the lines of his regiment. The skirmishers had advanced but a short distance in front of the line when they were engaged, and soon drove the enemy from their front. As soon as it became dark I was called on for one more regiment, which I sent out on the road near where the fighting had been done during the day, and was put in position, forming on the right of the road, and there remained until about 9 o'clock, when the troops were withdrawn and my regiment returned to the line of works I had built during the day. At 12 p. M. the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods commanding, returned from the railroad.

The next day we resumed our march, marching about five miles, and was assigned a position on left of road, where we halted, facing to the rear, and put up a line of works. Marched again about 2 o'clock same day, halting for the night about five miles farther, at Gordon Cross-Roads, and put up another line of works. Next morning at 7 o'clock resumed our line of march and moved on toward Irwinton, crossing the Oconee River at Planter's Ferry, and encamped that night at Irwinton Cross-Roads, where we lay in camp until 12 m. the next day, resuming our march, keeping all the time on the right of Central railroad. Nothing of any importance transpiring; capturing mules and horses and contrabands every day. Moving toward Savannah, we struck the Ogeechee River below Millen, and after crossing Scull's Creek halted for one day, my brigade crossing the river and destroying about one mile of railroad; returned the same day. Marched the next day. My brigade, having the advance, was delayed about one hour in repairing the bridges over Nevil's Creek, this being the 4th day of December. Fifth day we marched about sixteen miles, encamping four miles south of Mill Creek. Lay in camp on the 6th until noon, marched nine miles, and encamped for the night. 7th, lay in camp until 12 m., changed front, and encamped for the night, having three regiments in my front line behind works which I had thrown up. Next day marched seventeen miles, and encamped for the night. About 1 o'clock of the 9th, by order from Brigadier General C. R. Woods, my brigade was ordered three miles farther, with instructions to report to Major-General Osterhaus, at Eden Court-House, where we took a position and threw up works. At 12 o'clock that night I received orders from Major-General Osterhaus to move at 4 o'clock on the direct road to Dillon's Bridge, and to take measures to pass the camp of Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, by 7 o'clock in the morning, which I did, crossing the Ogeechee River on a foot bridge at Dillon's Crossing, my teams crossing on the pontoon about two miles farther up the river, and moving on the towpath along the canal until we struck a cross-road running to the King's Bridge road, filing right, and encamping for the night near the Little Ogeechee River close in front of the enemy's works.

Next day we tried to get to King's Bridge road, about could not on account of the road being full of cavalry moving. After dark I moved with the balance of the division across the causeway, in front of the enemy's guns, and camped on the King's Bridge road, nine miles from Savannah. Nothing of importance transpired for some days. Remaining in the same camp, and, with a detail from my brigade, put up a line of works and furnished one regiment each day to support the battery by