War of the Rebellion: Serial 092 Page 0063 Chapter LVI. THE SAVANNAH CAMPAIGN.

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crossing the river above and getting to it by some of the numerous cross-roads. An enemy would not be likely to do this, unless he were in largely superior force, since he would necessarily put himself in a "pocket. "

Third. The defense of the river navigation: This is best accomplished by a force stationed at this city large enough to go out and fight any enemy that would be likely to approach. In order that our opponents might reach any of the points where they could injure us much, they would be compelled to thrust themselves some miles beyond us, leaving whatever garrison there might be in Savannah on their flank and in rear. They could not interrupt navigation without establishing themselves in inclosed works upon the bank of Saint Augustine Creek (we hold Fort Jackson), and a very short time would suffice for the capture of any enemy having temerity enough to do this. With all our great resources of water transportation I regard it impossible for our enemy to make a successful lodgment on Saint Augustine Creek.

I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. POE,

Captain, Engineers, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army,

Chief Engineer Military Division of the Mississippi.

A map* is in course of preparation, under my direction, which will clearly show the topography of Savannah and vicinity, the works of attack and defense, the new lines constructed during our occupation of the city, and the lines of 1814. As soon as completed it will be forwarded to the Engineer Department. +

All of which is respectfully submitted.

O. M. POE,

Captain, U. S. Engineers, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

Numbers 5. Report of Captain Thomas G. Baylor, U. S. Army, Chief Ordnance Officer.

Memorandum list of ordnance and ordnance stores captured from the enemy in the campaign from Atlanta to Savannah, ending December 21, 1864:

Captured and destroyed by the Left Wing at Milledgeville, Ga.

Rifle muskets, caliber, 69. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,300

Lances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,000

Cutlasses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,500

Small-arm ammunition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rounds. . . 30,000

Artillery ammunition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Do. . . . . 5,470

Powder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pounds. . . 20,000

Captured in Forts McAllister, Beaulieu, Rosedew, Bartow, Thunderbolt, Jackson, Lee, Boggs, Brown, Water Battery opposite Fort Jackson, Lawton Battery, in the lines around the city of Savannah and in the city of Savannah.

ARTILLERY.

For smooth-bore gun. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

For rifled guns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

For mortars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209

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* See Map 2, Plate LXX of the Atlas.

+ For continuation of report, relating to the campaign of the Carolina, etc., see VOL. XLVII, Part I.

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