War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0928 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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CHAMBERSBURG, August 26, 1864.

(Received 7.20 p.m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff.

Enemy have withdrawn their artillery from opposite Williamsport. Our forces hold the fords. Early reported with his main body near Shepherdstown.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE SUSQUEHANNA No. 198.

Chambersburg, Pa., August 26, 1864.

1. Major General George Cadwalader, U. S. Volunteers, military commander, Philadelphia, Pa., will proceed without delay to Bloomsborough, Pa., and assume command of the U. S. troops in Columbia County.

* * * * *

By command of Major-General Couch:

JNO. S. SCHULTZE,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SUSQUEHANNA,

Chambersburg, Pa., August 26, 1864

COMMANDING OFFICER,

Loudon Gap:

SIR: There will be a force of our cavalry at McConnellsburg this afternoon. Make arrangements with the commanding officer there to keep you informed should the enemy enter the valley of McConnellsburg. We also have cavalry at Mercersburg. It will be well during the present excitement to have a lieutenant with fifteen men at the lower fort in the direction of Loudon, to be ready to stop up road upon positive information that the rebels are approaching the mountain. You will keep your men well in hand and allow no more straggling and thieving from the poor people down the mountain.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General, Commanding Department.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SUSQUEHANNA,

Harrisburg, Pa., August 26, 1864.

Captain WILLIAM BURGESS, Loudon:

CAPTAIN: The commanding general directs me to inform you that the enemy are in large force on the south bank of the Potomac, their line extending from Shepherdstown to Clear Spring, and requests that you get your company together and be in readiness to assist Captain Walker in Path Valley, or the troops on the road leading from Loudon to McConnellsburg, to resist their advance should they cross and move mountain roads, may be the means to keeping a considerable force of the enemy back and cause them much annoyance.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. S. SCHULTZE,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.