War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0886 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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not calculated to advance the interests of service or to smooth matters in your command. You will, therefore, proceed at once to execute this order, ten to fifteen men in each party, directed to observe the movements of the enemy now advancing on the Charlestown pike. Acknowledge the receipt of this, time when received, and when parties are started. You will also keep out a light line of mounted vedettes and be ready to move your whole force dismounted into action.

J. H. WILSON,

Brigadier-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION, ARMY OF WEST VIRGINIA, No. 32.

Near Halltown, W. Va., August 22, 1864.

I. Major Timothy Quinn, First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry, having reported for duty, is hereby placed in command of the Second Brigade, he being the senior officer on duty with the brigade.

By command of Brigadier-General Duffie:

E. W. CLARK, JR.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

August 22, 1864-5.30 p.m.

Brigadier-General STEVENSON,

Commanding District of Harper's Ferry:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that as soon as General Duffie reports to you, he will be ordered by you to carry out the verbal instructions given you by General Sheridan this p.m.

Very respectfully,

JAS. W. FORSYTH,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

NO. 27 BARCLAY STREET, NEW YORK,

August 22, 1864.

Captain BIER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of West Virginia:

CAPTAIN: Your communication of the 19th instant, stating that you have been directed by the commanding general to inform me that General Order No. 66, current series, assigning General Stevenson to the command of the Military District of Harper's Ferry, did not relieve me from duty in the district, and that it was expected that I would be assigned to a command by General Stevenson, has been received (on the 20th instant, between 11 and 12 o'clock) too late to reply to it before my departure. I have tried in vain to find some cause for the act of the general commanding to relieve me of the command which I have held for the last five months, and since which time I have made myself perfectly conversant with all the peculiarities of its defenses. I am not aware of having committed any military fault, or neglected my duty in any way whatever, which could have caused the discontent of the general commanding, and therefore feel the more hurt and humiliated by