War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0819 Chapter LV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

morning. I am unable to encamp at the precise place indicated by you on account of scarcity of water. No chance to obtain forage from the country for my command. I am encamped about one mile from the town on the Charlestown road. All roads are clear.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. N. DUFFIE,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, August 16, 1864.

Brigadier-General DUFFIE,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: In accordance with instructions just received from Major-General Sheridan, I request that all the cavalry now under your command and belonging to this division and the Second Division, Cavalry Corps, be assembled at or near Berryville and turned over to my command as soon as we shall reach Berryville, which will probably be at 2 o'clock this p.m.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Martinsburg, W. Va., August 16, 1864.

LieutenantColonel J. W. FORSYTH,

Chief of Staff, Middle Military Division:

COLONEL: I have the honor to request that the detachment of the Eighth Ohio Cavalry at Beverly be ordered to join the regiment at this place at once. It is impossible for the enemy to occupy West Virginia west of the Alleghany Mountains until the railroad is repaired west of Staunton. The country is perfectly destitute of supplies, and no force except small parties can operate in Randolph County. There are plenty of discharged soldiers in Barbour and Harrison Counties who can take care of all the guerrillas in that section. It is very important that the 400 men of the Eighth Ohio Cavalry, now at Beverly, should join the regiment at once. It is one of the best veteran regiments in service, but is unfortunately armed with the Union carbine, in which the men have no confidence. I desire to get the regiment together and arm them with Enfield rifles. They are the finest skirmishers and sharpshooters in service. Their separation is detrimental to their discipline and their accounts are in a very disorderly state. In its present position it is of no use; together, it would add greatly to the strength of my division.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. W. AVERELL,

Brigadier-General.