War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0631 Chapter LV. MOSBY'S OPERATIONS.

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WEDNESDAY, September 21, 1864.

Board met pursuant to adjournment, but again adjourned to wait for witness.

THURSDAY, September 22, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

FRIDAY, September 23, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

SATURDAY, September 24, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following Monday.

MONDAY, September 26, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

TUESDAY, September 27, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

WEDNESDAY, September 29, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

THURSDAY, September 29, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

FRIDAY, September 29, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

SATURDAY, October 1, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following Monday.

MONDAY, October 3, 1864.

Board met and adjourned to following day.

TUESDAY, October 4, 1864.

Board met; all present, General Stevenson presiding.

first Lieutenant William Dean, First U. S. Cavalry, regimental quartermaster and acting assistant quartermaster of Cavalry Reserve Brigade train, being duly sworn, testified as follows:

Lieutenant DEAN: On our about the 12th of august I received orders from Captain Mann from all the army trains to move to Winchester. this order assigned the Cavalry Corps train a place in the order of march in the rear of the whole train. On this I went and consulted the quartermasters of the First and Second Brigades of my division to determine the order of our brigade trains. The determination was: The Second Brigade to take the lead, the First Brigade the second place, and the Cavalry Reserve Brigade the rear, thus placing it in the rear of all. Up to this time I had not been able to get forage to load my forage train-forage train of the brigade, seventeen wagons. Captain McKinney, the commissary of the brigade, had all his supplies loaded. On this I considered it best for the public service to send forward those wagons that were loaded with subsistence stores, &c., under the charge of Captain McKinney, the commissary of subsistence of the brigade, and I would remain behind whit the forage train, empty, and hasten the loading of it, and have it ready, if possible, to go to the front under escort of General Duffie, who, I understood, was to go next morning; and, if possible, to bring on the proper supply train of the brigade, which was on its way from Washington to Harper's Ferry, and expected to arrive every moment. I was, however, unable to get my forage train loaded until on or about the 14th of August. In the meantime I heard that the train had been attacked and destroyed, and Captain Mckinley wounded.