War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0623 Chapter LV. MOSBY'S OPERATIONS.

Search Civil War Official Records

sary guards are sent here twenty wagons whit their loads can be saved. I was camped with my command last night on the pike five miles from Winchester. Immediately on hearing of the attack on the train I moved my command to this place with all possible speed, and arrived here at 6.45 a. m. the enemy, discovering our approach, retreated inn haste across the country. Our forces are following, but there is very little, if any, chance of recovering more property than I have mentioned above. Mosby had a mountain howitzer, which he used in the attack.

yours, respectfully,

P. M. FARRINGTON,

Major, Commanding First rhode Island Cavalry.

?After which the Board adjourned to meet at 9 a. m. following day.

HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF HARPER'S FERRY, Harper's Ferry, W. Va., September 9, 1864.

Pursuant to adjournment, Board met at 9 a. m. this day, Brigadier-General Stevenson presiding, Colonel Graham and Lieutenant-Colonel Cook both being present.

Brigadier-General Kenly being duly sworn testified as follows:

On the morning of the 12th of August, while lying at Halltown, an orderly brought my from Harper's Ferry orders from Major-General Sheridan to escort a train to Winchester. The order directed me to reach Winchester that evening, the 12th. It was at 9.30 a. m. that I received the order. The order directed how the trains were to move, which was-first, the train of the sixth corps; second, of the Nineteenth corps; third, that of the army of the Department of West Virginia; next,the Cavalry Corps train. I was also directed to brig with me General Emory's battery; that I would be held responsible for the safety of the train, and that it would be entirely under my control,or words to that effect.

Immediately after receipt of order I assembled my staff officers together and read the order to them and sent my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Huidekoper, One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, into Harper's Ferry to hurry out the trains and bring up the battery. I then proceeded to issue my orders, which were to the following effect: That the train would move according to the order of General Sheridan. My own brigade train (General Kenly's) was put in the rear of the Cavalry Corps train. My brigade consisted of three small regiments, the third Maryland, the one hundred and forty-ninth and One hundred and forty-ninth and One hundred and forty-fourth Ohio National Guards, the two latter 100-days' men. It was the turn of the One hundred and forty-fourth Ohio to be rear guard. My orders were, and so delivered to the colonels commanding, in writing: Two companies of the Third Maryland should preceded he leading wagons of the train, and the remainder of the regiment was to abe distributed in the train in the proportion of one company to every twenty wagons, counting from the head of the train. The companies of the One hundred and forty-ninth Ohio National Guard were to be distributed in the proportion of one company to every twenty or thirty wagons, counted from the rear of the wagons guarded by the Third Maryland. the One hundred and forty-fourth Ohio National Guard was directed to be distributed in the following manner: Two companies, under charge of the lieutenant-colonel commanding the regiment, were ordered to be posted in the rear of the last wagon of the train. There were but six companies in the regiment, and the remaining companies were directed to be distributed between every twenty wagons, counting from rearmost end of the train. I also ordered that should the battery report, one section of it should march at the head of the train. I also ordered that should the battery report, on section of it should march at the head of the train, in the rear of the two companies of the advanced guard; one section in middle of train, supported by a company of infantry, and one section in the rear of the train, in advance of the two companies of the One hundred and forty-fourth Ohio.

At the time these orders were issued I was totally ignorant of the number of wagons that would constitute the train, except so far as I could judge of the number from seeing the wagons the preceding day lying inside of Bolivar Heights. These orders were issued, delivered to the regimental commanders,and the regiments, ready to march before my aide returned, and before a single wagon had reached Halltown, where my troops were lying. Between 11 and 12 o'clock some wagon came down the road from Bolivar and halted where my troops were lying on the roadside I rode toward them to ascertain who was in charge of them, but I could not learn from any one who was in charge, but was told by one of my staff officers, whom I sent to inquire, that there was a quartermaster over among a group of dismounted men near the roadside. I sent for him and directed him to report to me. He came promptly and reported that he was Captain Russell, quartermaster Sixth