War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0612 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. F Chapter LV.

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October 2, attacked Wilson's division of cavalry on the south side of the river at Brigader and drove them across and beyond. In this engagement Lee's division, commanded by General Wickham, participated. On the 6th of October I received notice that the enemy was falling back from Harrisonburg, and I was directed by the lieutenant-general commanding to send a portion of my command through the Luray Valley and to follow the enemy with the remainder (see accompanying order from General Early, marked A).* McCausland's brigade was on duty holding Swift Run and Brown' Gaps and could not join me in time to take part in the pursuit. Imboden's brigade was ordered to move through the Luray Valley. With Jackson's and Johnsons' brigades, numbering about 800 men effective, I moved to Keezletown, and the next morning found the enemy in small force (infantry) about two miles above Mount Jackson. They retired rapidly. I succeeded in capturing about twenty prisoners and saved two mills and several barns which they had prepared to burn. I pursued beyond Mount Jackson, and, on the hill above Edenburg, found the enemy's infantry drawn up in line of battle. At this time there was but one squadron of the enemy's cavalry in my front. I was in advance (on the turnpike) of General Rosser's command, which was then engaged with the enemy's cavalry on the Back road. I withdrew my command and encamped about five miles below Mount Jackson,a nd notified the commanding general of the position of the enemy in line. Our forces were at that time at New market. Near dark a division of the enemy's cavalry came across from Rosser's front and engaged my pickets until dark, the infantry retiring. Receiving orders to follow the enemy (see accompanying paper marked B),* I moved at daylight and found a picket of two regiments of cavalry at Edenburg. Drove them to Woodstock, at which place I found a brigade of cavalry drawn up beyond the town and the place in flames. The picket was charged through the town and the support routed. Pushing on the Four-Mile House I again found the infantry formed in line of battle and received the fire of their skirmish line. Still being in advance of General Rosser, I withdrew to Woodstock, notifying Generals Early and Rosser of the enemy in force in my front. After moving into camp, hearing General Rosser engaged on the Back road, I again advanced and engaged the enemy until dark to prevent them from concentrating on his front. Receiving orders front he lieutenant-general commanding to push on in the morning, I notified General Rosser of my intention to advance at daylight. I could see but two brigades of cavalry in my front, which had advanced since the night before. I drove them back to their infantry support. Hearing the firing on General Rosser's front retiring rapidly, and stragglers coming from his command whit the statement that his force was broken, I withdrew my force slowly, the enemy pressing. As long as the country was broken and wooded my command retired in good order and checked the enemy from making a rapid pursuit. The enemy at this time brought a column from the Back road, which advanced steadily on my left while I was engaged in front. On reaching the open and unbroken country at Woodstock the enemy harped Johnson's brigade, which was completely broken. I wa unable to rally this command. The brigade on the right of the road was unbroken and was detached to meet the force advancing on the left, and retired in good order. The enemy pursued in force to Edenburg, a small party following to Mount Jackson.

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*Not found.

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