War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0610 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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campaign, and under the difficulties of transporting supplies so great a distance. Ordnance stores have been supplied to the full extent of need from battle-fields, and it has been a matter of regret that want of transportation has prevented our saving more ordnance supplies from the same source. Our animals have been worked hard and very poorly supplied with grain; grazing and hay have, however, been abundant, and they are in excellent condition. The troops have been well supplied whit rations of flour and beef, to which the country has added milk, butter, and vegetables; are consequently in good health.

EDWIN L. MOORE,

Major and Assistant Inspector-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE, September 10, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded.

Special attention called to the remarks of Major Moore, which show the embarrassments under which the two consolidated brigades of this division suffer. The troops of the old organizations feel that they have lost heir identity, and are without the chance of perpetuating the distinct and separate history of which they were once so proud. this loss of prestige must excite to some extent a feeling of discontent, but it is gratifying to know that the men and officers still fight with "conspicuous gallantry and constant success."

H. E. PEYTON,

Assistant Adjutant and Inspector General.

No. 186. Reports of Major General Lunsford L. Lomax, C. S. Army, commanding Cavalry Division, of operations September 19-November 2 and 12.

HEADQUARTERS LOMAX'S CAVALRY DIVISION, November 2, 1864.

MAJOR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this division on October 19, 1864, to this date:

Previous to the above period portions of this command were daily skirmishing whit the enemy on an extensive picket-line or in a direct attack made by our troops. On three separate occasions different brigades moved to Martinsburg, driving the enemy beyond that place, destroying the railroad or preventing the enemy from repairing it. On the 19th of September (the day of the battle of Winchester) my command was divided, in consequence of a portion of the army whit Jackson's brigade of cavalry having moved to Martinsburg on the day previous and McCausland's and Imboden's brigades having relieved a portion of the infantry at Bunker Hill. Johnson's brigade, on picket on the line of the Opequon, received the enemy's attack, but was soon driven to the infantry support. It was then moved to the right of the line, where it remained during the rest of the engagements, one-half being dismounted and deployed on the right of the infantry skirmishers. The enemy threatening to turn our right, Jackson's brigade and after-