War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0607 Chapter LV. THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY CAMPAIGN.

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Rude's Hill whit the balance of the army, formed line of battle, and threw out our sharpshooters, which, whit the line, drove the enemy back rapidly in the direction of Mount Jackson. Our sharpshooters followed them for several miles, but could not overtake them. We returned to camp, remaining there until the 14th of December, when we took up a line of march for Staunton, Va., which we reached on the evening of the 15th, and then took the train for Richmond, arriving there on the night of the 16th; then came to Dunlop's Station and went into winter quarters on Swift Creek, near the turnpike, where the brigade has since been stationed.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. COWAND,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Major G. PEYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS GRIMES' BRIGADE, October 30, 1864.

MAJOR: I have the honor to report the part taken by this brigade in the late engagement of 19th at Cedar Crek, Va.:

It, with the other brigades of the division, moved on the evening and night of the 18th to the right and below the town of Strasburg, Va., until it reached the road leading to Front Royal, and thence down this road until it had turned the left flank of the enemy on the opposite side of the river; there halted and waited until daylight, when it crossed the river, and whit the other troops attacked and drove the enemy from their camps and beyond Midletown. When near this point three of the regiments were thrown out as skirmishers-Thirty-second North Carolina troops on the right, Forty-fifth and Forty-third and Second North Carolina Battalion, with a few men from Forty-fifth and Forty-third, drove the enemy up and nearly off the hill, but having no support on their right (other troops failing to come up in time) they were temporarily checked and had to fall back. The brigadier soon reformed them and they moved forward again, but found the enemy had evacuated the position. After this the brigade moved forward, under a slight shelling from the enemy, and formed a new line. Here the army rested for several hours, when the enemy formed and charged this part of the line. This brigade was ordered to make a countercharge and meet the enemy, which it did very handsomely, with a yell and two volleys. The enemy broke and ran back, leaving one color and many men lying in our front. We remained here for some time, when we were ordered back to a line in rear. This was soon formed, and here remained until the left of the army gave way, when we were ordered to fall back, which we did, and retired with the army to Fisher's Hill.

The brigade lost 11 killed and 108 wounded and a few prisoners. All the missing, whit a few excepting, have returned.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. G. COWAND,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Major G. PEYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.