War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0505 Chapter LV. THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

I.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

Woodstock, Va., September 23, 1864

Brevet Major-General AVERELL:

Your report and report of signal officer received. I do not want you to left the enemy bluff you or your command, and I want you to distinctly understand this note. I do not advise rashness, but I do desire resolution and actual fighting, with necessary casualties, before you retire. There must now be no backing or filling by you, without a superior force of the enemy actually engaging you.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

K.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION, No. 41.

September 23, 1864

I. Brevet Major General W. W. Averell, commanding Second Cavalry Division, Department of West Virginia, is relieved from duty with that command and will at once proceed to Wheeling, W. Va., there to await orders from these headquarters or higher authority. General Averell will only take with him his personal staff. Colonel William H. Powell, Second West Virginia Cavalry is assigned to the command of the Second Cavalry Division, Department of West Virginia, until otherwise ordered.

* * * * *

By command of Major-General Sheridan:

C. KINGSBURY, JR.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ADDENDA.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA, No. 22

In the Field, August 9, 1864.

The brigadier-general commanding congratulates the officers and men of the division upon the brilliant success achieved by their valor at Moorefield on the morning of the 7th instant. A boastful enemy of double your numbers was completely routed, many killed, his artillery captured with three battle-flags and over 400 prisoners. But with our exultation is mingled a profound grief at the loss of Major Conger, Third West Virginia Cavalry, who found death as he had always wished, in the front of battle, with heart and hand intent upon the doing of his duty. Brave, steadfast, and modest; when he fell this command lost one of its best soldiers, and his regiment and general a friend. The men who followed him in the charge will never forget his glorious example or that of the gallant Lieutenant Clark, who fell by his side. The thanks of the division are given to Colonel W. H. Powell and Major Gibson, commanding brigades, for the irresistible elan with which they led their men against the enemy. The conduct of Captain Kerr, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, the daring with which he penetrated the enemy's lines of battle, taking a battle-flag from a regiment in his dash after the rebel commander is worthy of our highest admiration; with his horse killed under him and a severe wound in the