War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0450 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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inch of ground. This advance was handsomely made by all the brigades; at the time it was intended more as an offensive-defensive movement than one looking to a final victory. The enemy withdrew from the open country, evidently fearing the attack and possible capture also withdrew to a safer position. Sheltered by the woods on each flank and the houses and fences of Middletwon, the enemy (Kernshaw's and Pegram's divisions) in our front, Kershaw on the extreme right, continued a sharp skirmish, varied by attacks on both sides, until the final advance by the whole army under the major-general commanding. Shorty after taking position on the left of the line as above described, Colonel Mooore's brigade, Second Division, was ordered to report to the First Division for orders. This brigade, having skirmishers on the line to the left of the pike, was ordered to advance with the line of the First Division ; it did so handsomely, fighting with spirit while it remained with the command; it was ordered to the left toward Front Royal later in the day by the chief of cavalry. During the entire day the enemy kept up an artillery fire on our position which was truly terrific; it has seldom been equaled for accuracy of aim and excellence of ammunition. The batteries attacked to his division did nobly, but were overpowered at lines by weight of metal and superior ammunition. So excellent was the practice of the enemy that it was utterly impossible to cover a cavalry command from the artillery fire; a number of horses and men were destroyed by this arm during the day. As the news spread through the command that the major-general commanding the army had arrived a cheer went up from each brigade in this division; every officer in the command felt there was victory at hand; they all had confidence in him who had formerly commanded them more directly in trying circumstances, and when the order was given for a general advance each veteran in the First Division bent his brown resolutely and rode fearlessly toward the goal. Words are but poor vehicle to convey a description of the scene; suffice it to say, the charge was successfully made, each brigade doing its duty nobly. The Reserve and Second Brigades charged into living wall of the enemy, which, receiving the shock, emitted leaded sheet of fire upon their devoted ranks; but the enemy were broken and fled before there sistless force of the blow, coupled with the stern, steady, unrelenting, yet swift, advance of the infantry, who, under the new regime, excited the admiration of all beholders.

The First Brigade, in column of regiments in line, moved forward like an immense wave, slowly at first, but gathering strength and speed as it progressed, overwhelmed a battery and its supports amidst a desolating shower of canister and a deadly fire of musketry from part of Kershaw's division, at short range, from a heavy wood to our left. Never has the mettle of the division been put to a severer test than at this time, and never did it stand the test better. The charge was made on an enemy well formed, prepared to receive it with guns double-shotted with canister. Into that fearful charge rode many a noble spirit who met his death. One more prominent than the rest, if individual prominence among a band of heroes is possible, received his death wound-the fearless Lowell, at the head of as gallant a brigade as ever rode at a foe, fell in the thicket of the fray, meeting his death as he had always faced it-calmly, resolutely, heroically. His fall cast a gloom on the entire command. No one in the field appreciated his worth more than his division commander. He was wounded painfully in the early part of the day, soon after which I met him; he