War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0415 Chapter LV. THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY CAMPAIGN.

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were shot. Taking advantage of this, three caissons of Battery D, First Pennsylvania Artillery, and five pieces of Battery B, Fifth U. S. Artillery, with its battery wagon and forge and wagon train, moved out to the right and reached the pike, whence, though under a heavy fire for more than a mile, they all got out safely, except the battery wagon, the horses of which being shot,fell into the enemy's hands. In extricating Battery B, Fifth U. S. Artillery, Lieutenant Brewerton was captured at the rear of his column, and Second Lieutenant Samuel D. Soutworth, Second U. S. Artillery, the only other officer then with it, was killed. Battery L, First Ohio Artillery, having been withdrawn, with the loss of only one caisson, it was placed in position about 800 yards to the rear, and one the same side of the pike, where it fired with effect, until the infantry line gave way, when it fell back, and was put in position on some heights near the left of the Sixth Corps, where it again fired a few rounds. As the lines fell back, being without support from the few rounds. As the lines fell back, being without support from the infantry, I withdrew it, keeping it between the left of the Sixth Corps and the right of General Devin's cavalry brigade. General Devin afterward gave me a squadron to support it, and I then I placed it in position near the pike just beyond Middletown, where it fired with marked effect on the enemy's infantry, who were advancing under cover of some buildings. Our lines then slowly falling back for about a mile, the battery ceased firing and retired. Battery B, Fifth U. S. Artillery, here joined me, having refitted as far as possible from its severe losses in the morning, and upon the advance of our lines, about 3.30 p. m., I placed it in position on the east side of the pike, where it fired with great precision upon the enemy's artillery. The supply of ammunition becoming short in the absence of caissons, I was compelled to send three pieces back to the ammunition train to refile their limber-chests. I then moved forward Battery L, First Ohio Artillery, and two pieces of Battery B, Fifth U. S. Artillery, in charge of Second Lieutenant C. Holman, up the pike, and put them in position a short distance north of Middletwon, where I was able to get an enfilanding fire upon a battery of the enemy and a portion of his infantry line who were making a determined resistance at a point of done with solid shot from Captain Gibbs' Napoleons and shell from the section of rifled guns of Battery B, Fifth U. S. Artillery. The enemy being forced back, and being now joined by the three other pieces of at a trot through Middletown, and when about half a mile from Cedar Creek took the gallop until the column reached the heights above the cree, on the west side of the pike. From this position we overlooked the enemy's column for more than a mile beyond. His rear was some 600 yards only to our front. I immediately opened the Napoleon guns, firing toward the rear of the column, the rifled guns farther in advance. The firing was very accurate, almost every shell exploding directly in the crowded masses before us. After a very few rounds evidence of complete demoralization could be plainly seen, wagons and artillery abandoned by their drivers and dashing along the road in Our cavalry, who had now formed, then charged and easily captured everything is sight. The enemy attempted to cover his retreat by a battery, which fired with great precision for a short time, causing a number of casualties, among others Captain Gibbs, Battery L, First Ohio Artillery, who was severely wounded. Upon the advance of the cavalry I ceased firing. It was then almost dark.