War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0282 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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did most excellent service. Later in the day, about the time I received the order to move to the left, we were exposed to a severe fire of artillery from a battery of the enemy near Winchester, and I placed Captain Bradbury's whole battery in position, and soon silenced it. Chase's section bravely fought its guns after the horses were killed.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

When this report was written General Dwight's report had not been received. When received it was found to contain errors and aspersions against other troops and officers, which require explanation.*

W. H. EMORY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

Lieutenant Colonel C. KINGSBURY, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Middle Military Division.

HDQRS. DETACHMENT NINETEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Harrisonburg, Va., October -, 1864.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the battle of Strasburg, on the 22nd instant [ultimo]:

On the 21st my corps occupied the left of the road, and I was directed to hold the road leading to Front Royal, and ascertain the force of the enemy that was across the Shenandoah River. A battery of artillery was placed in position and shelled the enemy's position across the river, and the Ninth Connecticut, Colonel Cahill commanding was pushed across a ford below and directed to fell the enemy's position. It resulted in ascertaining that a brigade of the enemy's cavalry occupied the opposite bank of the river. One regiment and a battery were also detached to the eminence overlooking Strasburg and the road to Front Royal, to prevent any re-enforcements to the enemy from that quarter. The night of the 21st I received orders to move corps at the break of day to occupy the position occupied the night before by the Sixth Corps, and to keep closed on the Sixth Corps, which was to move to the right. I ordered the First Division to move to the right and front of its then position, covering the ground and occupying the position occupied by Major-General Wright's front line on the evening of the 21st; but on reaching the position early in the morning I found my First Division commander absent, and had not obeyed my orders, and that the enemy's sharpshooters fired upon me as I rode upon the ground. A portion of my Second Division being then near at hand and ready to march I brought it rapidly up and occupied the vacant space. It was then too late to charge, and I placed the First Division, which had followed the Sixth Corps by a circuitous route to the rear, on the left of the Sixth Corps, two brigades of the Second Division on the left of that, and the remaining two brigades in reserve. My pickets and the Ninth Connecticut were kept in a very extended line to watch the Front Royal pike, and to prevent the brigade of the enemy's cavalry from crossing the river on our left where it was fordable nearly everywhere. My line was much attenuated, in order to enable me to comply with the two conditions-to connect with the Sixth Corps on the right and guard against the enemy's turning our left-and I strengthened it be temporary barricades.

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*See Dwight's report, p. 287, et seq.

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