War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0240 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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the right, and was in the second line of battle in the preliminary move of the Third Division of that day, which was successful. In the final charge, at 5 p.m., owing to the nature of the ground, the line became somewhat broken, but though broken the advance was not checked. Part of this regiment was the first to enter the enemy's works that day, when they took two pieces of artillery and many prisoners. In following up from this point the regiment was very much broken. Upon reaching the pike the regiment formed upon its colors and marched to where the division was bivouacked. The loss was one enlisted man wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. WOLCOTT,

First Lieutenant, Commanding Regiment.

Captain CHARLES H. LEONARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS 151ST NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,

November 2, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report the following action of this regiment in the engagement at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864:

Before daylight on the 19th of October this regiment was aroused from sleep by the discharge of musketry and artillery, and before the tents could be struck and men equip themselves bullets showered in and about camp like rain. The whole camp equipage, however, was packed and the line formed without confusion, the regiment taking its place in the brigade line, which was formed upon the hill back of the camp and facing what had been the left flank. The larger portion of the men and officers were absent upon the picket-line, but the few left rallied round in support of the colors, and did only in the movement of the forenoon of that day. At 12 o'clock the balance of the regiment rejoined, and, with the brigade, moved in position in the new line formed. Here they built breast-works, but no attack was made upon this part of the line. At 3 p.m. the line moved forward. This regiment, with one other of the brigade, were the first to uncover, and thus drew the whole fire of the enemy's lines. By this the line became somewhat broken, but the colors and majority of the regiment moved forward in the line and followed up the retreating enemy.

Both men and officers acted with great coolness and bravery this day; but the bravery of the color-sergeant, Edward Heller, and the whole color guard are especially to be commended. When the line broke out upon the pike the colors of the One hundred and fifty-first were ahead of all others.

Lieutenant-Colonel Fay being sick, the regiment was commanded by Captain B. N. Wiles, who was wounded in the early part of the engagement, when the command devolved upon Captain H. A. Kimball.

The loss was 1 commissioned officer wounded and 1 enlisted man killed and 11 wounded.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. WOLCOTT,

First Lieutenant, Commanding Regiment.

Captain C. H. LEONARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.