War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0218 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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I saw, the colors of the other regiments of our brigade in the works while the First was still charging up the hill. From the position of the line, my regiment has less distance by nearly the length of its front to pass over in charging than the troops on the right.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STEPHEN C. FLETCHER,

Major, Commanding Regiment.

Major WILLIAM H. LONG,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 45. Report of Major Charles A. Milliken, Forty-third New York Infantry, of operations September 22.

HDQRS. FORTY-THIRD BATTALION NEW YORK VOLS.,

October 1, 1864.

SIR: Learning that the First Brigade of the division claims to have captured the battery at Fisher's Hill on the 22nd of September, 1864, I have the honor to forward the following report of the part taken by the Forty-third Battalion New York Volunteers and other regiments belonging to the Third Brigade:

The Forty-third Battalion New York Volunteers was in the second line of battle and directly in front of the battery captured, the One hundred and twenty-second New York Volunteers on the right, and the First Division on the left, the left of the First Brigade resting about 150 yards in rear of the right of the One hundred and twenty-second New York Volunteers. When the line advanced the Forty-third Battalion and One hundred and twenty-second New York Volunteers moved at double quick, mixing with the first line of battle, composed of the Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers and Seventh Maine Volunteers, the Forty-third Battalion placing the first colors upon the enemy's works, and, in conjunction with the Seventh Maine, Sixty-first Pennsylvania and One hundred and twenty-second New York, captured the battery claimed by the First Brigade. As soon as possible John Singleton, C. Fitzgerald, and Dennis Ganey, of the Forty-third Battalion, turned and fired one of the guns upon the flying enemy, who were retreating toward the Winchester and Staunton pike. The First Brigade did not advance until the Third Brigade was within fifty yards of the battery, and were some 200 yards in rear and to the right of the Third Brigade at the time the guns were captured. Thinking that quite a number of prisoners could be captured if the enemy were pursued, I ordered forward the Forty-third Battalion without detailing men to guard the captured guns, and when some 500 yards from the guns the battalion was fired upon by men belonging to the First Brigade who had just entered the works. One gun was also captured after crossing the pike by men belonging to the Third Brigade, and half a mile from the first guns captured. From the position occupied by the First Brigade in the line of battle at the time the advance commenced, it was impossible for them to capture any artillery unless they obliqued to the right and rear of the Third Brigade and passed through them, which they did not do.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHARLES A. MILLIKEN,

Major, Commanding Forty-third Battalion New York Volunteers.

Major WILLIAM H. LONG,

Assistant Adjutant-General.