War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0144 OPERATIONS IN N.VA.,W.VA.,MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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fatigue of medical officers. With each train was sent a surgeon in charge, a proper proportion of medical officers, stewards, and attendants; also cooked rations, anodynes, stimulants, dressings, &c., more than sufficient to last the usual number of days in making a trip. On arriving at Winchester these trains were divided among the different hospitals, and every man was dressed and fed during the night by a large detail of surgeons and attendants, and the same was repeated at Martinsburg before transfer to cars. A responsible medical officer provided with supplies, together with a proper number of attendants, accompanied each train. As the army was liable to move suddenly I did not consider it advisable to let sick and wounded accumulate, but sent them to Winchester, which had been made the receiving depot, using ambulances when the distance was not great and it was expedient to do so. Notwithstanding the distance wounded were transported in army wagons, in some instances as far as 100 miles, very few died on the road, which, fortunately, was a fine turnpike. In November fifty ambulances were placed at my disposal, which I turned over to the chief medical officer at Winchester to be used in carrying wounded to Martinsburg. No army wagons were either used or required subsequent to this date.

After the completion of the railroad to Stephenson's Depot, five miles from Winchester, early in December, the medical director of transportation was ordered to Harper's Ferry, and the medical purveyor to change his depot to that place. I also arranged with the chief quartermaster to have four hospital and two passenger cars kept at the above depot subject to my orders. These made two, sometimes three, trips per week, till the number of sick and wounded was reduced to less than 200, when the hospital cars alone were retained. The first week in January the Sheridan Field Hospital was closed, leaving in Winchester only the cavalry and Nineteenth Corps hospitals, which I designed keeping as long as the army retained its present position.

Having thus described the campaign, as far as it related to my department, as briefly as was consistent with the subject, I subjoin the following list of casualties:

Killed:

Battle of Winchester*....................... 659

Battle of Fisher's Hill*.................... 46

Battle of Middletown or Cedar Creek*........ 585

Total.......................................1,290

Wounded:

Various skirmishes occurring between August 20 to September 18, inclusive...................................1,026

Battle of Winchester, September 19*.........4,032

Battle of Fisher's Hill, September 21

and 22*.................................. 455

Skirmishes from September 23 to October 18... 402

Battle of Middletown or Cedar Creek,

October 19* ................................3,491

Skirmishes from October 20 to December 31... 600

Total......................................10,006

Confederate wounded who fell into our hands:

Battle of Winchester....................... 846

Battle of Middletown or Cedar Creek........ 451

Sent from hospitals at Harrisonburg........ 135

Total...................................... 1,432

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*But see revised tables, pp.118,124,137.

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