War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0036 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LV.

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KERNSTOWN, November 12, 1864 - 10 p.m.

(Received 7 p. m. 13th.)

Yesterday evening the enemy's cavalry made a demonstration on my front south of Newtown, and my scouts reported a large infantry force having moved down the pike to Middletown with the intention of attacking. This morning I had everything ready, but no attack was made. About 1 p. m. I moved Custer's division of cavalry up the Back road and the Middle road. Rennington's brigade met two brigades of Rosser's cavalry on the Back road, charged them, and drove them at a run four or five miles and across Cedar Creek, capturing some prisoners. While this was going on General Powell moved on the Front Royal pike and thence across toward Middletown. At Nineveh he met Lomax's cavalry, increased by what is called John Morgan's cavalry, charged it, capturing all of Lomax's artillery (two pieces), with caissons, horses, artillerymen, &c., and his ammunition train, and ran his cavalry up the Luray Valley for a distance of eight or nine miles. One brigade of Merritt's division moved up the pike late this evening, but nothing important occurred. Colonel Dudley's brigade, of the Nineteenth Corps, moved out to demonstrate in this cavalry movement; also some sharpshooters of the Sixth Corps. Our losses are very slight. I have to regret the loss of Colonel Hull, of Pennington's brigade, who was killed while gallantly leading a charge. Powell captured 14 commissioned officers, and brought in 35 wounded. As yet I have seen no infantry, and think the report of the scouts untruthful.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

KERNSTOWN, November 14, 1864 - 11 a. m.

(Received 10 p. m.)

The reconnaissance made yesterday by the cavalry enables me to give you definite information of the recent movements of the enemy here. Early moved with his whole army from New Market on the same day that I moved back from Cedar Creek, under the impression, so prisoners say, that a large number of the troops here had been sent North on account of the election. He came down to the north side of Cedar Creek on the 12th. The information given by my scouts was correct in every particular. Early's cavalry having been driven in and broken on both flanks, he fell back in fret haste on the night of the 12th instant, and, according to reports of prisoners, was going back to New Market. General Torbert pushed on to Strasburg yesterday, driving the enemy out of town and up to Fisher's Hill. The cavalry fight of Powell and Custer was very creditable. Merritt was but slightly engaged after dark with the enemy's infantry on the pike. The result of the day's operations was 20 commissioned officers, 225 men, 2 pieces of artillery, 3 caissons, 2 battle-flags, and 4 ammunition wagons captured, and the complete rout of the enemy's cavalry. Our loss was only 2 killed, 7 wounded, and 7 captured. The railroad will soon be finished to the crossing of the Opequon Creek. I can then get long forage for our animals. They are now suffering very much from the cold weather and insufficiency of food.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.