War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0033 Chapter LV. THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY CAMPAIGN.

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brave officers and men disaster has been converted into a splendid victory. Darkness again intervened to shut off greater results. I now occupy Strasburg. As soon as obtained I will send you further particulars.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

CEDAR CREEK, October 20, 1864 - 11.30 a. m.

(Received 12 m. 21st.)

We have again been favored by a great victory - a victory won from disaster by the gallantry of our officers and men. The attack on the enemy was made about 3 p. m. by a left half-wheel of the whole line, with a division of cavalry turning each flank of the enemy, the whole line advancing. The enemy, after a stubborn resistance, broke and fled, and were pushed with vigor. The artillery captured will probably be over fifty pieces - this, of course, includes what was captured from our troops in the early morning. At least 1,600 prisoners have been brought in; also wagons and ambulances in large numbers. This morning the cavalry made a dash at Fisher's Hill and carried it, the enemy having fled during the night, leaving only a small rear guard. I have to regret the loss of many valuable officers killed and wounded; among them Colonel Joseph Thoburn, commanding division of Crook's command, killed; Colonel C. R. Lowell, commanding brigade, wounded; Colonel R. S. Mackenzie, commanding brigade, wounded severely; would not leave the field. I cannot yet give exact details. Many of our men captured by the enemy in the morning have made their escape and are coming in. Ramseur, commanding division in Early's army, died this morning.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

CEDAR CREEK, October 21, 1864 - 4 p. m.

(Received 6 p. m. 23d.)

I pursued the routed forces of the enemy nearly to Mount Jackson, which point he reached during the night of the 19th and 20th without an organized regiment of his army. From the accounts of our prisoners who have escaped and citizens the rout was complete. About 2,000 of the enemy broke an made their way down through the mountains on the left. For then miles on the line of retreat the road and country was covered with small-arms, thrown away by the flying rebels, and other debris. Forty-eight pieces of captured artillery are now at my headquarters. I think that not less than 300 wagons and ambulances were either captured or destroyed. The accident of the morning turned to out advantage as much as though the whole movement had been planned. The only regret I have is the capture, in the early morning, of from 800 to 1,000 of our men. General, I want Getty, of the Sixth Corps, and the brave boys, Merritt and Custer, promoted by brevet. When I attacked the enemy Merritt and Custer, under the direction of Torbert, fiercely attacked the enemy's flanks, and when he broke closed in after dark and secured the artillery, trains, &c. My loss in killed

3 R R-VOL XLIII, PT I