War of the Rebellion: Serial 090 Page 0027 Chapter LV. THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY CAMPAIGN.

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Sixth and Nineteenth Army Corps, attacked the rebel works in front, and the whole rebel army appeared to be broken up. They fled in the utmost confusion. Sixteen pieces of artillery were captured; also a great many caissons, artillery horses, &c. I am to-night pushing on down the Valley. I cannot say how many prisoners I have captured, nor do I know either my own or the enemy's casualties; only darkness has saved the whole of Early's army from total destruction. My attack could not be made until 4 o'clock in the evening, which left but little daylight to operate in. The First and Third Cavalry Divisions went down Luray Valley to-day, and if they push on vigorously to the main valley, the result of this day's engagement will be still more signal. The victory was very complete. A more detailed report will be made as soon as I can obtain the necessary data.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

Woodstock, Va., September 23, 1864 - 8 a. m.

I cannot as yet give you any definite account of the result of the battle of yesterday; our loss will be light. General Crook struck the left flank of the enemy, doubled it up, advancing down along their line. Rickett's division, of Sixth Army Corps, swung in and joined Crook, Getty's and Wheaton's divisions taking up the same movement, followed by the whole line, and, attacking beautifully, carried the works of the enemy. The rebels threw down their artillery. It was dark before the battle ended. I pursued on after the enemy during the night to this point, with the Sixth and Nineteenth Army Corps, and have stopped here to rest the men and issue rations. If General Torbert has pushed down the Luray Valley according to my directions, he will achieve great results. I do not think that there ever was an army so badly routed. The Valley soldiers are hiding away and going to their homes. I cannot at present give you any estimate of prisoners. I pushed on regardless of everything. The number of pieces of artillery reported captured is sixteen.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE MILITARY DIVISION,

Two Miles form Edenburg, September 24, 1864 - 6 p. m.

(Received 25th.)

The result of the battle of Fisher's Hill gives us 20 pieces of artillery, 1,100 prisoners of war, a large amount of artillery ammunition, caissons, limbers, &c. Early expected to stay at Fisher's Hill, and had placed all his artillery ammunition behind the breast-works. A large amount of entrenching tools, small-arms, and debris were also taken; no accurate list received. I have been disappointed in the cavalry operations which were to have formed a part of this battle. My advance