War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 1361 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

one gun to bear. The traverses I find to be a perfect protection against enfilade. Take immediate steps to run a line of telegraph posts from your office to Reeves' Point. I want to put down a submarine telegraph between Fort Fisher and that point.

Yours, very truly,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Major-General.

SMITHVILLE, December 31, 1864.

Major General W. H. C. WHITING:

DEAR WHITING: I have been anxiously hoping to meet you since the attack on Fort Fisher, and would have gone there to have a talk with you had I not considered that both from you and General Bragg I had implied orders to remain here. For fear that we may not meet for several days, I write. Thank God, you have been successful, and all I have seen thus far highly applaud you. All say you exposed yourself too much. But I, reasoning that you had untried troops, can understand why you thought it necessary for you to be on the parapet. I wish I could have been there to do the same. I hear high praise of Lamb. Tell him that I congratulate him and am truly happy that has gained so much credit. I hope he will now see what you and I have wished him to understand always, that the credit of fighting his fort would be his. I am told that all my troops did very well -I mean such troops as had been under my command for some time. I get no credit for anything; I know this; I did not expect it under the circumstances. Do not get into any quarrel. We must bear with all. I feel sacrificed thus far.

Yours, truly,

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

December 31, 1864.

Colonel LIPSCOMB,

Sugar Loaf:

You will return to Masonborough, leaving a squadron at Sugar Loaf with the battery.

By command of Major-General Whiting:

W. C. STRONG,

Aide-de-Camp.

DECEMBER 31, 1864.

Colonel LIPSCOMB,

Sugar Loaf:

By direction of the major-general commanding, you will remain in command at Sugar Loaf, with your regiment and Paris' battery, picketing carefully all the approaches. Southerland's battery will also remain with you until further orders.

JAS. H. HILL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

86 R R - VOL XLII, PT III