War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 1257 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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Cox's Landing; nothing to indicate intention of enemy on our right. Have directed General Longstreet to re-enforce Pickett, and instructed Captain Mitchell to cooperate. The Sixth Corps arrived last night; reported on this front. Please expedite movement of troops from Waynesborough.

R. E. LEE.

PETERSBURG, December 7, 1864.

General E. P. ALEXANDER:

I wish you to proceed to Battery Dantzler. See General Pickett and endeavor to rectify matters.

R. E. LEE.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS, December 7, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Petersburg:

General Longstreet has gone across the James River. Hoke's division and Haskell's battalion of artillery have also gone over. General Pickett has just telegraphed that the enemy is in small force on his side of the river. He is holding his lines and is not uneasy.

O. LATROBE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS, December 7, 1864.

General R. E. LEE:

General Pickett telegraphs that the enemy is crossing at Cox's Landing. If that is the case he had better extend his left, so as to inclose that neck of land, replacing his troops on the right by some of the unreliable troops that are expect do-day. It is said that the troops in front of General Pickett are negroes; if that is true it is hardly probable that any attack will be made by the enemy along that front. It will therefore be best to occupy that part of our line by troops that are not likely to be so efficient in the field. I have directed General Alexander to open such of his batteries upon the bridge as he can bring to bear upon it.

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS, December 7, 1864.

General R. E. LEE:

I have just returned from General Pickett's left. I find but a small force of the enemy have crossed to that point. I have halted Hoke's division at the bridge to await your instructions. Please send them at once that the troops may move on, if you still think them needed on the south side.

J. LONGSTREET.