War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 1165 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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[Second indorsement.]

General COOPER:

It seems to me better to assign General Hill as a major-general, and explain to him that thus only could we employ him at this time and at that place. This is subject to other views if it should be proposed to send General Beauregard to Mobile.

J. D.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

RICHMOND, VA., February 16, 1864.

General D. H. Hill,

Davidson College, Mecklenburg, N. C.:

GENERAL: After due consideration of the terms and intent of the law authorizing the appointment of lieutenant-generals it has been concluded that officers of that rank are only available for the command of army corps. The President, desiring that the public should not here-after lose the service of an officer whose zeal and gallantry have been so conspicuous as your own, has deemed it better not to ask for your confirmation in the rank of lieutenant-general, in order to leave you in that to which you have been already confirmed, and has directed me to offer to you service as a major-general in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. You will, therefore, with as little delay as practicable, repair to Charleston and report to General Beauregard, commanding that department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

RICHMOND, VA., February 16, 1864.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding, Charleston, S. C.:

General D. H. Hill, now at Davidson College, Mecklenburg, N. C., has been ordered to report to you with his former rank and date of major-general.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, Va., February 29, 1864.

General D. H. HILL, Provisional Army, S. C.,

Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I have received your answer of the 23rd instant to my letter to you of the 16th of the same month.

As my letter was written under the instructions of the President, it became necessary that I should lay before him your reply, which I have accordingly done.

You state in that reply that-

Unless the assignment to duty be accompanied by an unequivocal expression of undiminished confidence in my (your) capacity, gallantry, and fidelity, I (you) can accept no position that may be tendered.