War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 1067 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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The enemy's gun-boats and barges below Poplar Point on the Roanoke River. On Tuesday evening the fight continued three hours. The enemy were repulsed, with severe loss. They resumed the attack on yesterday and landed some sharpshooters. Their main fleet of gun-boats and transports lies below in attacking force. The advanced guard of attacking force moving against Gordonsville, supposed to consist of 1,000 or 1,500 cavalry, reached Madison Court-House, fifteen miles from Gordonsville, on Wednesday. The main body, comprising infantry and cavalry, were reported to be coming up. During yesterday the cavalry advanced three or four miles in the direction of Gordonsville, and at last accounts our troops were skirmishing with them. It is reported that Rosser has driven the enemy back down the Valley.

E. O. C. ORD.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

December 23, 1864.

Brigadier-General TURNER:

The enemy refuse to receive flag of truce on the New Market road. They will receive them only in front of Fort Harrison. I would suggest that if an officer goes out from last-named place that he should tell them that they need not be so damned particular, for we know that Hoke is gone. I have sent back the letters.

ALF. H. TERRY,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HDQRS. DEFENSES OF BERMUDA HUNDRED, VA.,

ARMY OF THE JAMES,

December 23, 1864.

Colonel H. C. WARD,

Commanding Brigade:

COLONEL: The ten picket-posts on the extreme left of your front will be relieved this evening by a detail from General Thomas' brigade, and occupied by him permanently hereafter. You will reduce the detail for picket duty from your command to 200 men, and establish the posts on the river mentioned in your conversation with the general commanding this day.

By order of Brevet Major-General Ferrero:

GEO. A. HICKS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

December 23, 1864.

Brigadier-General TURNER,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I send you an important refugee, George E. Baker, one of principal operators of the telegraph in Richmond. He has good news that you may not have received before, viz, the capture of Savannah, and Fort Fisher, at Wilmington. He can give you other important intelligence. The scout who brought him through got drunk, and I have him also. He has been running refugees through for some time and wants to go back. I think he had better be sent, but wish to know your orders in the case, and in order that he may see as little as possible of our lines I have kept him here. He is not a very brilliant man, and could not tell much if he was sent back.

Very respectfully, &c.,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.