War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 1023 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-FOURTH ARMY CORPS, December 16, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel SMITH:

In view of the consideration which you suggest in your dispatch, I think it would be best to send the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts to Bermuda. Major Ordway, who now commands that regiments, is one of the best officers in the Army of the James, and will, I am sure, make a great improvement in the manner of distributing recruits.

ALF. H. TERRY,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, CAV. DIV., ARMY OF THE JAMES, December 16, 1864.

ACTING ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters Cavalry Division:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that nothing of importance has occurred on the picket-line of this brigade during the three days, December 13 to 15, beyond the occurrence of the 15th, mentioned in my report of that day. The enemy having then posted themselves in the breast-works on the left, across the Darbytown road, captured one of the pickets on its advance in the morning, an din the skirmish that followed wounded two horses, but shortly after, the rebels having retired to the edge of the woods, our line was

re-established in its original position.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. W. EVANS,

Colonel First Maryland Cavalry, Commanding Brigade.

BURLINGTON, N. J., December 17, 1864-1.30 p.m.

(Received 3.30 p.m.)

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I leave here at 8 p.m. to-day for City Point, via Washington.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WASHINGTON, December 17, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

The great battle between the U. S. forces under Major-General Thomas and the rebel army under General Hood, before Nashville, resulted yesterday in a great and decisive victory for the Union arms. The rebel army has been broken and routed, a large portion of its artillery and great numbers of prisoners captured. This triumph has been achieved with small loss to our army. General Thomas reports that his loss has been very small, probably not exceeding 300, and very few killed.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.