War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 1014 OPERATIONS IN SE.VA. AND N.C. Chapter LIV.

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The dots on our own line indicate the number and position of the sentinels. On the enemy's side they only indicate his line approximately.

Respectfully submitted.

Your obedient servant,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE, CAVALRY DIVISION, December 15, 1864.

ACTING ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters Cavalry Division:

MAJOR: I have to report that the vedette of my picket-line, upon advancing to their day portion this morning, found a strong line of the enemy along the Darbytown road, to the left, and in the breast-works, and one of our men was captured by them. The enemy still holds the breast-works and the portion of the road in front of the fields. My line is now established from the point of wood on the left across the fields in the rear of the Johnson house to the Darmy road on the right, connecting with Colonel West. I have sent one battalion to the line. The enemy is not advancing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. W. EVANS,

Colonel First Maryland Cavalry, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA, December 15, 1864.

Captain A. L. FITCH,

Thirteenth [New York] Artillery:

SIR: Please say to General Butler that immediately upon the arrival of General Wild at this place the force was dispatch to Plymouth. I had an interview with the senior naval officer from that place; everything was to be in readiness to move at 2 o'clock on the morning of the 8th. The following day an expedition was sent to threaten Kinston from here. It is presumed that the expedition from Plymouth started at the precise hour designated, but I have no official information from that expedition since it left Plymouth. Unofficial information has been brought here that there of the naval vessels, to wit, the Otsego, Blakesby, and Picket-boat No. 2, had all seriously injured by torpedoes in the Roanoke about twelve miles above Plymouth. This is the only information I get from the expedition up the Roanoke. The expedition from here to Kinston encountered unforeseen obstacles in the sudden rise of water in the Neuse River. All calculations based upon fording the river were frustrated thereby. The most fearful and violent weather commenced at the starting out of the expedition. It was, perhaps, successful in drawing away attention from forces up the Roanoke. I cannot account for not having received anything official from the Roanoke, and shall send immediately to ascertain the state of affairs.

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.