War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0925 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the vicinity. Scout Skinner, dressed in rebel uniform, circulated among them in the Bull Pen this evening, and elicited the foregoing information.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNumbers C. BABCOCK.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

December 10, 1864.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The Church road station reports:

10.35 A. M.

There is now a column of infantry moving westward on Boydton plank road, nine minutes in passing a point 15 degrees west of north from this station. They apparently came out of enemy's front line of works north from this place. The column was well closed up and marched rapidly. Too smoky to discern any changes in enemy's camp. At 8 a.m. three trains of cars passed in direction of Petersburg on South Side Railroad. At 8.45 a.m. two trains passed out from Petersburg; could not distinguish the number of cars.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Colonel and Chief Signal Officer.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

December 10, 1864.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The Church road station reports:

At 1 p.m. a train of cars passed westward upon the South Side Railroad. The number of cars could not be distinguished. At 2.10 p.m. a train of fifteen wagons and one piece of artillery and one caisson passed westward upon the Boydton plank road. It was too misty to discern whether there were any changes in the enemy's camps.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Colonel and Chief Signal Officer.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

December 10, 1864-5 p.m.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

The following report from station near Friend's house is respectfully forwarded:

At 2.10 p.m. caught of column of enemy's infantry on road just west of Richmond pike and parallel thereto. They were moving toward Petersburg, and were steadily passing a given point for fifteen minutes. The head of the column was not seen, as a few minutes before observing the movement the road was enveloped in fog. Quite a number of stragglers followed the column.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Colonel and Chief Signal Officer.