War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0912 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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Run until you ascertain with some certainty that there is no force of the enemy on your right flank nearer than their intrenched positions on Hatcher's Run. They may send some force down on your flank along the Dabney Mill road. Should it be desirable, you can return by the Halifax road, or any other crossing Hatcher's Run below your point of crossing. Keep me advised of what occurs.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

December 9, 1864.

Major General N. A. MILES,

Commanding Reconnaissance:

The major-general commanding the army thinks it not unlikely that your movement may bring on a general engagement, extending from Hatcher's Run to our intrenchments. He thinks it more prudent that you confine your operations to holding your position at Hatcher's Run with the infantry, and let the cavalry, with a small infantry support, push out and ascertain what they can of the enemy. I will order Wheaton to move at once to the vicinity of Tucker's or Thompson's, and co-operate with you and keep the road open.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

December 9, 1864-12.30 p.m.

Major General N. A. MILES,

Commanding Reconnaissance:

Look out for the Duncan road while you are on this side of Hatcher's Run. The enemy may be strong enough with his re-enforcements to send some force down that way on your flank and rear. The Duncan road crosses Hatcher's Run at Armstrong's Mill.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General of Volunteers.

P. S.-General Wheaton is ordered to be ready to move to your support should circumstances require it. He will take 4,500 men and four rifled guns.

A. A. H.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

December 9, 1864.

Major-General MILES,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: Lieutenant Stacey informs me that the cavalry are three miles beyond Hatcher's Run; everything quiet. If so, they must be near the intersection of the Halifax road. Can they be pushed out rapidly two or three miles farther, and learn from the people of the country, or stragglers, or contrabands, anything of the enemy's move-