War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0906 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

December 9, 1864-7 p.m.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

The following has just been received from General Wheaton:

I reached this place 6.15 p.m.; found General Miles' troops only a sufficient distance from the main army picket-line to permit my troops to be massed between it and Miles' command. General Miles feels very strong and holds everything between here and Hatcher's Run. NO enemy out of his intrenchments to trouble him. Had no room for my transportation outside the picket-line and left it just within the main line. My headquarters are with General Miles, at the Cummings house.

F. WHEATON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

December 9, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: The inclosed letters have just been received from General Miles in the condition they are now forwarded. No communication was sent with them. I have instructed General Miles to send the rebel mail-carrier to me at once. I have not examined any of the letters.

I am, general, very respectfully,

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

December 9, 1864.

Major S. CARNCROSS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I have advanced the cavalry to the junction of the Quaker road, and have ordered a squadron to advance up the Quaker road as far as Stony Creek and follow toward the Boydton road until they struck the enemy. I will forward two prisoners of Butler's cavalry. A negro near the Quaker road reports hearing firing in the direction of Dinwiddie Court-House.

N. A. MILES,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

(Forwarded by Humphreys to Meade).

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

December 9, 1864-7.40 p.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Dispatch from Miles received. As I understand, the Quaker road, as marked on our map, has been prolonged or opened to Stony Creek, and forms now what is called the Military road. It was coming up that road from Stony Creek that the mail-carrier was captured. I