War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0873 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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11.40 A. M.

Colonel B.:

All quiet. Boats in same position.

R.,

At C.

(Same to A. B.)

Colonel B.:

A train of fifteen wagons just passed open space going to the front. In Chester-field a working party removing lumber from Strahan['s upper landing.

R.,

At. C.

(Same to A. B.)

3.50 P. M.

Colonel B.:

One battery of artillery drilling on Gilliam's farm.

STEUART'S FRONT.

Eleven ambulances, followed by two brass pieces of artillery and one regiment of infantry, just passed, going toward front in Prince George. No unusual activity observed. Thirty wagons passed up the river and twenty down during the day. Negro pickets in our front again. Enemy still strengthening their works. Usual Drilling observed. Dredging machine still at Dutch Gap.

R.,

Sergeant, at C.

(Same to A. B.)

4 P. M.

Major P.:

I report there have passed in rear of Battery 5, going toward enemy's left, three trains, one of five box and two flats; one of fifteen boxes, and the other of three coaches and five flats. Forty-two wagons and one piece of artillery in rear of same battery, going toward City Point. Three trains, one of four boxes, one of one, one of five, and other of eleven boxes and two flats and thirty-five wagons. One engine was observed to come on the old railroad from City Point to a point in rear and above the Covington house and return.

W.,

Sergeant, at D.

4.45

Major P.:

One train of ten cars and one flat just passed, going to enemy's left. The flat and one box-car being loaded with troops on top.

W.,

Sergeant, at D.

H. W. HOLMAN.

The above is just received and respectfully forwarded.

L. A. DILLINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Signal Officer.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

December 8, 1864-8.50 p. m.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The plank road station reports:

Just as it was becoming dark the enemy withdrew, as it were, individually from their intrenchments between the Weldon railroad and the Jerusalem plank road, beyond which places the lookout could no longer discern, to the number of about 1,300. They moved toward their right or westward.