War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0871 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

December 8, 1864-10.25 a. m.

Lieutenant W. S. STRYKER,

Adjutant, Signal Corps:

Camps west of railroad and south of lead-works have the appearance of being partly broken up. No apparent changes at other points.

CAROTHERS.

All quiet this a. m.

HOLMAN.

A train of about twelve black covered wagons moving west of Richmond pike. Small train of ambulances moving opposite direction. No visible changes on this line.

JORDAN.

No report from Avery house.

Respectfully forwarded.

L. A. DILLINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Signal Officer.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

December 8, 1864-4 p. m.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The station near the Friend house reports:

A train of two engines, six platform, nine box and three passenger cars passed into Petersburg on Richmond railroad. The box and passenger cars were loaded with troops. At 3 p. m. 1,500 infantry moved toward Butler's front on the Richmond railroad.

Station in front of Fort Howard reports:

The camps inside of the intrenchments and to our right of the lead-works for the distance of about half a mile were broken up, and portion of the troops moved toward Petersburg in small detachments. Two small columns of about 100 infantry each moved westward on the Cox road.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Colonel and Chief Signal Officer.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, SIGNAL DEPARTMENT,

December 8, 1864-6 p. m.

Major General G. G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Station in front of Fort Howard reports:

At 4.30 p. m. about 1,000 infantry and one piece of artillery left the fort near Butterworth's house and moved westward upon the Boydton plank road. At 5.15 p. m. troops were moving west in rear of the intrenchments. They were somewhat scattered; were first seen about half a mile east of the lead-works. Darkness prevented seeing where they went. The camps for about half a mile east of the lead-works are all gone excepting a few tents.

In front of the position of the Second Corps the camps remain the same since the morning report. The reports from the right have not come in yet.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Colonel and Chief Signal Officer.