War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0750 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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in camp near Burgess' Mill on the 27th instant, his wife being with him on a visit. Hampton is known to have a son, now in South Carolina, who was recently wounded in Hood's army. If his name is Wade it may account for the proclamation in the Augusta papers. The prisoner will not answer directly whether any of the cavalry has gone south, but the inference from his examination is that ho mounted force has gone. I have ordered Gregg to move with all his available force to-morrow, and endeavor to ascertain if the enemy is building a railroad from Stony Creek, and try to find out whether any forces have gone south. I have replied to Major-General Wilcox that the same reasons which interfered with his asking his commanding general's interposition will prevent my returning Private R. A. Pryor, viz., the impossibility of sanctioning this irregular and unauthorized intercourse. I have moreover informed him that I have recommended the dismissal from the service of Captain Burrage, of a Massachusetts regiment, who a few days ago allowed himself to be captured in the same manner as Mr. Pryor was taken.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., November 30, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

One division of the Sixth Corps leaves Stephenson's Station at 11 a. m. to-morrow for Washington, and will embark and be on its way here by the morning of the 2nd. The other two divisions will follow, a day intervening between the departure of divisions. I would suggest that the Sixth Corps be put in the line to relieve the Fifth Corps.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., November 30, 1864 - 10 p. m.

Admiral D. D. PORTER,

Fort Monroe:

Southern papers show that Bragg with a large part of his force has gone to Georgia. If we can get off during his absence we will stand a good chance, not only to carry Fort Fisher, but to take Wilmington. The troops will be ready to start the moment you are ready.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

U. S. FLAG-SHIP MALVERN,

Hampton Roads, November 30, 1864.

(Received 12.30 a. m. December 1.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point:

Can start in three days on the original arrangement of 12,000 men. Will take a little longer to fit powder vessel.

DAVID D. PORTER,

Rear-Admiral.