War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0738 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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Should the exigencies of the service require my command to be turned out, it would become necessary to relieve it, and it would be better to relieve it before than after such an emergency; and even should no such emergency arise, it is not usual to place horse batteries in redoubts as long as there are foot batteries to do the duty. If the battery cannot be relieved it should be notified of the fact in order that the commander make his horses and men as comfortable as the situation and permanency of the duty will justify, and that I may take steps to provide the cavalry with an available battery for any event.

Trusting that the general will give his earliest attention to this matter, I remain,

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUGUST V. KAUTZ,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Cavalry Division.

NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON, U. S. FLAG-SHIP MALVERN,

Hampton Roads, November 29, 1864.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point, Va.:

What time may I expect you here?

DAVID D. PORTER,

Rear-Admiral.

CITY POINT, November 29, 1864 - 9.05 p. m.

Brigadier General JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff:

The Richmond Inquirer of to-day says that it is no longer contraband to state that General Breckinridge's troops are now marching on a campaign that will soon make Kentucky ring with the shouts of his men if Burbridge has not already felt the shock of his steel. It says further that intelligence from Augusta, of the 26th, states that the Macon train arrived on the previous night at the usual time, and that the rumor that the Central road had been cut was incorrect. The Augusta papers of the 25th, says the Whig, report that General Wayne had whipped Kilpatrick's cavalry division at the Oconee. Wheeler with many thousand men has intercepted the enemy at a point at present unmentionable, and is giving them no rest night or day. The Richmond papers all assert that Grant is moving heavy columns to our left with a view of seizing the railroad, and deserters from Grant report great activity among his troops. They also claim that Mahone captured from sixty to seventy prisoners from the Bermuda line on Monday night. General Bragg assumed command of North Carolina, with headquarters at Wilmington, on the 17th.

T. S. BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CITY POINT, VA.,

November 29, 1864. (Received 8.31 a. m.)

Major-General MEADE:

I leave here at 10 a. m. for Fortress Monroe. Will be back early in the morning.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.