War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0722 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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A. Pryor, Third Virginia Cavalry, giving the names of every officer and soldier taking part in the capture. I am directed to add that the commanding general disapproves of retaliatory acts not directed by himself or a superior authority.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

November 27, 1864.

Brigadier-General POTTER:

GENERAL: I have the honor to call your attention to the following extract from telegram just received from headquarters Army of the Potomac:

The commanding general desires that you will make a minute report of all the circumstances connected with the capture of Private Roger A. Pryor, Third Virginia Cavalry, giving the names of every officer and soldier taking part in the capture.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. M. LYDIG,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Poplar Spring Church, Va., November 27, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Brigadier General S. G. Griffin, commanding Second Brigade, for report, with as little delay as practicable, in compliance with within extract from telegraphic orders.

By command of Brigadier-General Potter:

SAML. WRIGHT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP ELEVENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE VOLUNTEERS,

Near Pegram House, Va., November 27, 1864.

Lieutenant IRA G. WILKINS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that Private Roger A. Pryor, Third Virginia Cavalry, was captured in front of our picket-line, near Doctor Boisseau's house, under the following circumstances: Lieutenant Durgin, Thirty-second Maine Volunteers, who was on the right of the line, noticed this man several times between the lines waving papers and importuning our men to come out and exchange. The lieutenant sent to the left of the line for me, and when I came up this man (Pryor) came out from their lines and, waving his papers, beckoned me to come out and meet him. Mistaking him for an officer, I expressed the intention to the officers about me to go out and take him prisoner in retaliation for Captain Burrage, who was taken by the enemy in front of the picket-line of the First Brigade under similar circumstances. I immediately went out to meet him, and shook hands with him, telling him at the same time that he might consider himself my prisoner, in retaliation for Captain Burrage. He made