War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0703 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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CITY POINT, November 25, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

I shall be at home all day.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., November 25, 1864 - 2.15 p. m.

(Received 2.25 p. m.)

Major-General MEADE:

Finding you are not at my headquarters yet, 2 p. m., I suppose you are not coming down to-day. To-morrow I shall go up to the James River and out to General Butler's headquarters, and if you feel like it would be glad to have your company.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

November 25, 1864. (Sent 2.45 p. m.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Your telegram of 2.15 p. m. is received. General Meade is now on his way to your headquarters.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., November 25, 1864.

Brigadier General R. INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster, City Point, Va.:

Major-General Butler reports that the battery and cavalry horses of his army are suffering for hay, and that the Government is losing large sums in the depreciation of these horses from this cause. The Secretary of War directs that you immediately report who is responsible for this state of things.

C. A. DANA,

Assistant Secretary of War.

CITY POINT, VA., November 25, 1864.

(Received 9.40 p. m.)

Honorable C. A. DANA,

Assistant Secretary of War:

I have frequently called on the Quartermaster-General personally, and have communicated with him by mail and telegraph, on the subject of forage, and have expressed my fears that there would be suffering for want of hay. He receives my report of forage daily, showing what is on hand, the number of animals, and so far as I am informed he has given all necessary orders. I have recently asked him to force the shipments to be increased. The quartermasters here understand that we are dependent on Colonel Brown and General