War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0699 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, November 24, 1864.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: On November 2 I addressed a letter to Major-General Meade, commanding Army of the Potomac, in reference to articles that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer and New York Times, in relation to the fight at the Boydton plank road, inclosing at the same time a copy of the article in the Inquirer and promising to send a copy of the New York Times. I have not been sable to secure a copy of the letter paper containing the article referred to since that time; neither have I heard of the action of the major-general commanding the Army of the Potomac in reference to the article in the Inquirer. The object of this note is to ask what action has been taken in reference to the article in the Inquirer, as up to this time the receipt of my letter above referred to has not been acknowledged.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS, November 24, 1864.

General S. WILLIAMS:

General Mott and General Miles desire permission to visit Dutch Gap to-morrow, during daylight.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, November 24, 1864-8.20 p. m. General W. S. HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

I will send in a short time an answer to your dispatch asking that Generals Miles and Mott be authorized to visit Dutch Gap to-morrow. I have retained your dispatch to lay it before General Meade with other papers this evening, as it did not seem to require and immediate answer.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, November 24, 1864-9.20 p. m.

General W. S. HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

The commanding general has no objection to your authorizing Generals Miles and Mott to visit Dutch Gap to-morrow other than that arising from allowing two division commanders to be absent at the same time. If, however, you consider that both officers can be absent without prejudice to the safety of your line you can give them the necessary permits.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.