War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0658 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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480 horses to be supplied. In a country like this and with such attenuated lines as it has been necessary to establish to control so great a territory with so small a force of all arms, a respectable force of well mounted cavalry is necessary. The present number is only sufficient to do the necessary picket and vedette duty, and occasionally to scout the immediate front to keep the country clear of guerrillas. But with the desired addition I shall be able to constantly harass the enemy, penetrating into his country, cutting his railroads, destroying his brigades and store-houses, and collecting quantities of cotton and tobacco, which, f left alone, will prove a source of large revenue to the rebel Government. I trust that this will meet with your early and favorable consideration, and that the desired number of horses may be sent to the commanding officer of the Twelfth New York Volunteer Cavalry at this place.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

[First indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, In the Field, November 26, 1864.

Approved and respectfully forwarded to Adjutant-General's Office.

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Second indorsement.]

DECEMBER 8, 1864.

Cavalry horses will be issued to Department of North Carolina and Virginia in proportion to numbers of dismounted men, and assigned to such regiments as General Butler may direct.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

BURLINGTON, N. J., November 19, 1864-1.30 p. m. (Received 2 p. m.)

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I start to New York at 3 p. m. If there is any reason for my no going, please telegraph me; or your think I should be at the front, let me know, and I will get there as fast as possible. As any train I would have to take from here to Washington starts from New York, I would likely get there as soon from the latter place as from here.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

BURLINGTON, N. J., November 19, 1864-11.30 a. m.

General J. A. RAWLINS,

City Point, Va.:

I left directions for the troops to be in readiness to move in case the enemy should detach largely to the South. Should such a thing occur