War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0629 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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I am not ambitious to command armies or corps, other than the Second Corps, unless the public service is thought to be in question, and am not disposed to put myself in the way of any dispositions the Government may desire to make, but, public interests not intervening, I desire to look after my private affairs. I therefore as for a leave of absence for twenty days.

I am, general, yours, respectfully, &c.,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

November 16, 1864-9 p. m.

Major-General HANCOCK:

I think you have misapprehended my telegram. The suspension of action in the veteran corps was due, I third, to the election and press of affairs incident thereto, and not to any proposed change of commanders. It was distinctly understood by me to-day that you were to be put on this duty, and the telegram was in reply to one inquiring why the order had not been sent. The construction upon the reply was, the order would come in a day or two. I would therefore suggest your awaiting action in this matter before taking a leave.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

November 16, 1864-9.40 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

I leave the matter of my dispatch of this evening in your hands entirely for such delay as you may think proper.

Your obedient servant,

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. 2nd DIV., SECOND ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 79.

November 16, 1864.

In restoring to the Eighth New York Heavy artillery, the Thirty-sixth Wisconsin, and the One hundred and sixty-fourth New York their colors, which these regiments were deprived of the right to bear by General Orders, Numbers 63, August 30, 1864, from these headquarters, the major-general commanding the division rejoices in the feeling that, as in the first instance, a sense of duty required him to take them away, so now the same sense of duty compels home to return them, for these regiments have in a most glorious manner testified on the field of battle their right to bear colors and their ability to protect them. The gallantry with which they regained their colors is a sufficient guaranty that hereafter they be safe in their hands. The major-general commanding has nothing to regret in his action in this case, since it has been the means of demonstrating in so marked a manner the real worth and gallantry of these regiments.

By command of Major-General Gibbon:

A. H. EMBLER,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.