War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0526 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION CAVALRY CORPS,

November 5, 1864-12 m.

Major General A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that no movements of the enemy are observed in front of the picket-line of this division. About Davenport Church, and between that point and James River guerrillas are constantly prowling about. Patrols and scouting paries from my command are occasionally fired upon by guerrillas concealed in the thickets of woods. Yesterday a small scouting party of the enemy ventured up the plank road, but were driven across Warwick Swamp by a party of the Fourth Pennsylvania, on duty near Gary's Church. The officer commanding a regiment on picket toward James River reports that he has reason to believe that at least one family, living out side and near our lines, is engaged in aiding the escape of deserters from our army. I have directed such measures to be taken as will secure positive proof of this if it is so.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. McM. GREGG,

Brigadier-General of Vols., Commanding Second Division Cavalry.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,

ARMY OF THE JAMES,

In the Field, Va., November 5, 1864.

Major-General TERRY:

Signal officer at Cobb's Hill reports thirteen freight-cars heavily loaded with troops going toward Richmond. Report from tower on James River that enemy are building three more batteries to their left of those above Cox's Ferry, on north side of river.

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT BRADY, VA. November 5, 1864.

Colonel H. L. ABBOT,

Commanding Siege Artillery:

COLONEL: Have the honor to report that the rebels, having been drowned out of their Coehorn battery in the swamp by the recent rain (perhaps the 4. 5-inch gun helped them along) removed their pieces during last night to the old position behind the point of woods. This morning they opened with a vengeance, but gradually "tapered down to a fine point." Shall not have much difficulty with them where they are, I think. The infantry colonel came rushing into the fort to-day, and reported a new work of the rebels which he was sure would cause us much trouble. It proved to be the very battery we were firing at.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. PIERCE,

Captain, First Connecticut Artillery.