War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0525 Chapter LIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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review officially your action in the premises, but fully aware that the course pursued by the Seventy Michigan is liable to great abuse, he is unwilling it should be taken as a precedent in the command. The main object in his late order depriving certain regiments of the right to bear colors, was not so much to prevent loss of colors as to impress upon the command that to be worthy to carry them they should be willing and anxious to fight for them. Please to communicate this letter to the commander of the Seventh Michigan and such others as you may deem necessary.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. HENRY EMBLER,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

November 7, 1864.

The views of the division commander are approved. The system of destroying colors in times of danger, or of sending them from the field on such occasions, is not calculated to cause the troops who remain to fight the better. Stragglers seeing colors carried to the rear are apt to make it an excuse to follow them, and better men seeing their colors sent off have a right to think that their commander has considered it to the hopeless task longer to defend them. Far better to lose colors to the enemy bravely fighting for them than to send them to the rear when danger arises. The object of a color is to form a rallying point for the men in time of danger.

Copy respectfully furnished division commanders.

By order of Major-General Hancock:

SEPTEMBER CARNCROSS,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

November 5, 1864.

Brigadier-General WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report that al was quiet in my front yesterday and last night. Nothing unusual transpired.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

November 5, 1864. (Received 10 a. m.)

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

Nothing unusual transpired along our lines during the past twenty-four hours. A refugee from Richmond came into our lines at daylight this morning: seems to be quite a knowing fellow. Says Lee has moved his headquarters to Petersburg; says he overheard Ould speak of a mine nearly completed: thinks it was aimed at Battery Numbers 5. What disposition shall be made of this fellow?

JNumbers G. PARKE,

Major-General.