War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0524 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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on a working party to the left of Fort McGilvery. During the fire the Eleventh New York Battery had one man killed. Nothing further of importance has occurred on the line during the past twenty-four hours.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNumbers G. HAZARD,

Major, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. ARTILLERY Brigadier, SECOND CORPS,

Numbers 185. November 5, 1864.

I. The commanding officer of Batteries C and I, Fifth U. S. Artillery will, on receipt of this order, withdraw his batteries from Fort Blaisdell and move them to near these headquarters, where he will report in person for further orders.

II. The commanding officer of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery will, on receipt of this order, place one section of the Tenth Massachusetts Battery will, on receipt of this order, place one section of his guns in Fort Blaisdell, relieving Batteries C and I, Fifth U. S. Artillery.

III. The commanding officers of Battery F, First Pennsylvania Artillery, and Batteries C and I, Fifth U. S. Artillery, will have their commands hitched and harnessed at 5 a. m. every morning until further orders.

By command of Major John G. Hazard:

U. D. EDDY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. FIRST DIV., SECOND ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 560. November 5, 1864.

* * * *

III. The Twenty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers (Major Fleming) will report to Colonel Robert Nugent, commanding Second Brigade, at once.

By command of Brigadier-General Miles:

WM. R. DRIVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION SECOND ARMY CORPS,

November 5, 1864.

Brigadier General T. W. EGAN,

Commanding First Brigade:

GENERAL: The major-general desires to invite your attention to the evil effect likely to result were the action of the Seventh Michigan in tearing up its colors in battle to be looked upon as justifiable, or as furnishing a precedent for other regiments. The motive which prompted the destruction of the colors was doubtless a good one, but how much perilous with its colors at its head, or lost them to the enemy after a gallant and desperate resistance. Colors lost under such circumstances would be returned to the regiment with all honor. Now, the regiment, by its own act, has deprived itself of colors, for it has destroyed them when it escaped itself. The general does not desire to