War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0512 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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tofore. My batteries at Petersburg and on James River have been constantly engaged, although less actively than in September. The following is the amount of the firing:

100-pounder Parrotts........................ 246

30-pounder Parrotts......................... 269

4 1/2-inch ordnance......................... 1,283

10-inch mortars............................. 486

80-inch mortars............................. 2,202

Coehorn mortars............................. 1,676

Total.......................................6,600

The total weight of iron fired is thus about 139 tons, or at a rate of 4.5 tons daily. I expect detached reports, from which I hope to derive much benefit in fixing the relative excellence of different projectiles. I have continued the collecting of samples of the different kinds of rifle projectiles, and Major Michler has photographed a second shot for me, of which I inclose a copy.) The collection itself, consisting of forty-five varieties of rebel and seventeen of U. S. projectiles, I sent on 29th to Major Benton to be forward to Brigade-General Cullum, for the military museum of the Academy. Since that date I have obtained three more varieties-two Hotchkiss shells, evidently manufactured by the rebels. The artillery captured by Major-General Ord, near Fort Harrison, was turned over to me. It consists of five heavy guns, viz, one 8-inch columbiad; one 32-pounder navy smooth-bore; one 32-pounder army, rifled and banded; one 12-pounder Richmond rifle on siege carriage, weight 6,700 pounds, throwing shot about forty pounds in weight; one 30-pounder rifle, weight 4,700 pounds, date 1864 rebel manufacture; and of eight field guns- all iron-6 pounder smooth; total captured, thirteen guns, also limbers, ammunition, &c. I have placed several new guns in position during the month, having now over 100 ready for firing. I have also been engaged in fortifying Broadway Landing, my depot, which was so much exposed to raids that General Hunt deemed it necessary either to do so or to abandon it. It is naturally a strong position, well flanked by deep ravines. I have connected them over the high land between them by infantry parapet with a good abatis in front, and made a strong redoubt in rear which commands the whole position; length of parapet, about 400 yards; redout square, about thirty yards on a side; armament, one siege and two field guns. I estimate that 300 men can hold the place against 2,000 men.

My address remains unchanged-"Bermuda Hundred, via Fort Monroe, Va." Write name of regiment in full.

Provided the department has them for distribution, I would require a copy of a good map of the Southern States, of the Shenandoah Valley, and of the vicinity of General Sherman's operations.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY L. ABBOT,

Captain of Engineers, Colonel First Conn. Arty., Commanding Siege Train.

BROADWAY LANDING, November 4, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General Hdqrs. Army of the James:

I would respectfully request attention to my memorandum of November 1, requesting that my telegraph office be re-established here. I