War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0434 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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informs me that he ascertained that once or twice last night the enemy advanced a small force and pushed back the cavalry pickets in the Johnson field, and they were in turn pushed back by our cavalry. They have now advanced a skirmish line or picket-line from the edge of the woods up to the intrenchments where they cross the Darby road. I have ordered General Ames to take two brigades and move out there, but I presume they will yield to a slight pressure and withdraw their line to the old position. I think there is nothing in the movement.

A. H. TERRY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH ARMY CORPS,

October 29, 1864 - 4.10 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

There was only a small party on the earth-works firing on the pickets. A few dismounted cavalrymen and Ames' skirmishers showed themselves and they went away. Our skirmishers are now on the works, exchanging shots with the enemy's pickets. Colonel West will establish his line in the old position, but thinks he cannot hold it if they choose to drive him away. Do you wish any portion of Ames' command to remain here?

A. H. TERRY,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL BUTLER'S HEADQUARTERS,

[October] 29, 1864 - 5 p. m.

Major-General TERRY:

Let Ames withdraw his men. Let Colonel West hold the position until he is driven out.

By order of Major-General Butler:

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SECOND DIV., 10TH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 33.

In the Field, Va., October 29, 1864.

The general commanding is pleased to have this opportunity of informing brigade and regimental commanders of the division that their conduct and the part which they have taken in the action and on the march of the 27th and 28th instant was such as to meet with the approval of the brevet major-general commanding the corps. He also takes pleasure in complimenting the division on their conduct during the march. Notwithstanding the number of recruits which have recently joined the command, there was little or no straggling. Both officers and men deserve much credit for thus overcoming one of the greatest evils of the army.