War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0404 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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CITY POINT, October 28, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

All I want is about the general result of the operations of yesterday by telegraph, so that I can send a dispatch to Washington

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 28, 1864 - 11 a. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Hancock's command and Crawford's division had recrossed Hatcher's Run by 7 a. m. I have directed Major-Generals Warren and Parke to remain in position sufficiently long to send all impediments to the rear and collect stragglers, and then to withdraw leisurely to their former positions in our intrenched lines. I find my dispatch of yesterday evening requires some modification. Major-General Hancock did not substantially yield any ground; he held the Boydton plank road till midnight. He is also unaware of the loss of any prisoners, except the usual stragglers scattered in the woods whom it was impossible to collect. He was compelled for want of transportation to leave a number of his most severely wounded. These were carefully collected and placed in the houses on the field and surgeons with supplies left with them. The whole number of prisoners reported to the provost-marshal-general up to this time is 689; these are exclusive of 200 turned over by the Second Corps to the cavalry not yet brought in, and 21 sent to City Point by Brigadier-General Miles. Prisoners report the death of Major-General Dearing. I am induced to believe the success of the operation, which was most decided, was mainly due to the personal exertions of Major-General Hancock and the conspicuous gallantry of Brigadier-General Egan.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 28, 1864.

Lieutenant-Colonel BOWERS:

In accordance with the orders of the lieutenant-general commanding, such portions of this army not required to hold the intrenched lines moved yesterday morning before daylight with the intention of extending these lines, if practicable, to the South Side Railroad. The forces moved in three column, the Ninth Corps on the road to Hawks', the Second Corps down the Vaughan road to Hatcher's Run, and the Fifth Corps on a line intermediate between the other two, parts of which had to be opened. Major-General Parke was instructed to move on the presumed position of the enemy's works, and if practicable to carry them. In case of his inability to do this (and he was directed not to attack if the works were found strong and well manned) he was to threaten and confront the enemy, and Major-General Warren, who was to support Parke in the first operation, was instructed, in case Parke did not attack, to cross Hatcher's Run and endeavor to get possession of the bridge by which the Boydton plank road crosses that stream. Major-General Hancock, with parts of the Second Corps and Gregg's division of cavalry, was ordered to cross Hatcher's Run by the Vaughan