War of the Rebellion: Serial 089 Page 0402 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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CITY POINT, VA., October 28, 1864.

(Received 6.20 p. m.)

Hon E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

The attack on General Hancock, now that a report is received, proves to be a decided success. He repulsed the enemy and remained in his position, holding possession of the field until midnight, when he commenced withdrawing. Orders had been given for the withdrawal of the Second Corps before the attack was made. We lost no prisoners, except the usual stragglers who are always picked up. Our captures for the day on the south side foot up 910. The rebel General Dearing is reported killed. General Meade in his report says:

I am induced to believe the success of the operation, which was most decided, was mainly due to the personal exertions of Major-General Hancock and the conspicuous gallantry of Brigadier-General Egan.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

October 28, 1864. (Received 4.30 a. m.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The following dispatch, received during the night, is forwarded for your information. General Miles has been directed to send the prisoners mentioned to City Point.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS,

Avery House, October 28, 1864.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I sent 100 men to the right of the Crater. They took a small work, with one gun in it, but before they could be supported they were driven out again by a superior force. Every effort was made to support them promptly, but a regiment of the enemy's infantry was in a work on their left and attacked immediately. The following-named persons were taken: Colonel Randolph Harrison, Lieutenant Colonel Peyton Wise, and Second Lieutenant Cox, of Forty-sixth Virginia, and Lieutenant Ryland, Thirty-fourth Virginia; eight men of Thirty-fourth Virginia, one of Forty-sixth Virginia, and four of Twenty-sixth South Carolina; all of B. R. Johnson's division, R. H. Anderson's corps. My loss was light. Enemy's chevaux-de-frise had to be cut before it could be crossed.

N. A. MILES,

Brigadier-General.

CITY POINT, October 28, 1864.

Major-General MEADE:

From your dispatch of last night it seems the enemy crossed Hatcher's Run below Hancock's position. Where was Crawford during this time? If he had followed your repeated instructions to Warren this could not have happened. Even after Hancock was attacked Crawford must have been in a position where, by boldly pushing up, he